Tag Archives: Basketball

Sunnyside street co-named for Queens basketball coach Jerry Ingenito


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer

Jerry Ingenito devoted his life to young players off and on the basketball court, and now his name will forever live on in one of the many communities where he coached.

Family and residents joined Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer on Saturday, September 21 to celebrate and honor the life of Ingenito, who coached young basketball players in the borough for more than 30 years, by co-naming the intersection of 38th Street and Greenpoint Avenue in Sunnyside “Jerry Ingenito Way.”

Ingenito coached at Saint Raphael’s Catholic Youth Organization in Sunnyside, Christ the King in Middle Village and Queens College in Flushing. His dedication to his career has helped influence the beginning stages of present and past NBA players including Lamar Odom, Craig “Speedy” Claxton, Derrick Phelps and Khalid Reeves.

Along with the street co-naming, Ingenito has been honored in other different venues since his passing in January. The Sunnyside/Woodside Boys and Girls Club named a summer basketball league at St. Theresa School in Woodside after Ingenito and the Bruns Summer basketball camp in Garden City offers two scholarships in his honor for young players from Sunnyside. The Cathedral High School summer camp, where Ingenito was a founder and director, also offers a scholarship in his honor.

 

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Former Knicks forward Larry Johnson greets players at Flushing basketball tournament


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Councilmember Peter Koo sponsored a basketball tournament Saturday morning in Flushing, which highlighted a guest appearance by two-time NBA all-star and former Knicks forward Larry Johnson.

The third annual Bland Basketball Tournament featured matches with young children, high school players and adults. The goal of the tournament is to bring more players and attention to the basketball court of the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) James A. Bland Houses, which are in need of repair.

“I think [basketball] is a good sport. It builds team spirit and this is what America is about, working as a team,” Koo said. “As councilmembers we like to help the community, especially what they call ‘the disadvantaged.’”

Koo donated t-shirts and trophies to the tournament and called Madison Square Garden, which owns the team, to have the former NBA Rookie of the Year Johnson make an appearance.

Johnson, who averaged 16.2 points per game and 7.5 rebounds during an 10-year career with the Charlotte Hornets and Knicks, was also the John R. Wooden awardee during the 1990-91 season, which is given to the most outstanding player in college basketball. Johnson met the kids and took pictures, then he did the tip off to start the matches.

“With everything going on in New York we just want to fill the courts,” Johnson said. “It means a lot to me; it warms the heart.”

Because the courts are part of the Bland Houses, the jurisdiction falls under NYCHA and not the Parks Department.

Koo has been in touch with the housing authority to get the park revitalized, repainted and fix the court’s slant. He plans to fund the renewal, but is waiting for NYCHA to examine the cost to upgrade the courts. With a revitalized court residents hope more people from the Bland Houses will use it, instead of going elsewhere.

Craig Kinsey, president of the James A. Bland Resident’s Association, said Koo has been instrumental in organizing the tournament and supporting the court revitalization, and has hope that the courts will be upgraded soon.

“It’s very important when you could put a suit and tie on and still talk to regular folk,” Kinsey said of Koo. “I can always count on him.”

 

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FDNY defeats NYPD at Queens South Responders Basketball Tournament


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Liam La Guerre

The Fire Department was just too hot to handle in the inaugural Queens South Responders Basketball Tournament at Daniel O’Connell Park on Sunday, August 25.

FDNY from Engine 317 and Ladder 165 defeated the 113th Precinct, 30-15, before crushing the community team 36-18 to win the tournament.

Jamahl Wright of the fire team scored the most points in both games, with 15 in the first and 9 in the second.

The game was organized to bring local first responders and residents together to build trust in the community.

“First responders are our partners of the betterment of our community,” said State Senator Malcolm Smith, who played for the community team, drawing on his experience playing basketball for Christ The King High School. “More important than winning is the camaraderie that comes about.”

Members of the Fire Department wore red, the NYPD wore blue and the community had white T-shirts on. While the game’s main message was about unity, the teams played very competitively.

“We out here to win,” said Shaka Gaines captain of the FDNY team. “You got be able to brag about something. So when we see them we can say ‘remember the game.’”

The first annual event brought tons of basketball fans from the community to watch. Unlike the Jump and Ball Tournament games that have been in the park every weekend during the month, these games were special, because only adults participated. It was also unique, because it brought local responders to the park for fun.

“This whole thing came together two weeks ago, so it’s a win in my eyes,” said Johnny Hines, a Community Affairs officer of the 113th Precinct. Hines came up with the idea of the game a few weeks ago and reached out to community leaders to put it together. “These guys would never be here in this park if this [tournament] wasn’t here.”

 

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LL Cool J returns to Queens for Jump and Ball Tournament


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Liam La Guerre

It’s not just Ladies who Love Cool James.

The rapper and actor, whose real name is James Smith, was surrounded by hundreds of male and female fans and residents for pictures and hugs as he made his way through Daniel O’Connell Park to watch the games of his 9th annual Jump and Ball Tournament on Saturday.

LL Cool J, who stars in “NCIS: Los Angeles,” started the tournament along with State Senator Malcolm Smith to give back to his community.

“There are a lot of artist who come out of southeast Queens, but I can tell you this is the only one I know who has stepped up and said ‘I want to give something back,’ and has stuck with it for nine years,” the senator said.

The event, which features basketball games every weekend until September 1, is free to register and participate. In past weeks there was also live music, free food and a variety of other family fun activities, including golf, chess, tennis, a karate showcase and rope tricks by Cowboy Curly Hall.

“I think it’s wonderful that he does this for the community,” said St. Albans resident Leticia Moore-Jackson. “He never forgot where he came from. He’s a great rapper, entertainer and a great person.”

Coming back home was special for James as well, because he said his schedule forces him to be everywhere around the country and sometimes abroad. He delivered a message to the children at the park about believing in your dreams, despite what others may say.

“Anything you really truly believe deep down inside you, you can accomplish,” he said. “And I don’t want you to ever think that because you’re from this neighborhood, my neighborhood, that you’re somehow relegated to only having a certain amount of success or you’re only able to do certain things based on where you’re from or the color your skin or what someone else says about you. Don’t believe that because it’s not true.”

James said the basketball tournament has turned into an important part of the year for the community and it is a significant event for him as well.

“This is the hood and basketball is just a big part of how we came up and how we grew up and I wanted to make sure that they had an opportunity to play and have fun,” he said. “I think they love it and I love it.”

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Kids: Shoot hoops with Carmelo Anthony at Queens College


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Queens College

In sports it’s good to be trained by the best.

And lucky pro-basketball hopefuls will have a chance to do just that when Knicks star Carmelo Anthony visits Queens College on August 3 and 4 to instruct young players at his basketball camp, Citi Camp Melo.

Anthony will join local coaches to talk about the fundamentals of the game at the two-day event. The basketball camp is open to boys and girls from grades 1 through 12 and children that participate in the camp will receive Anthony’s autograph, a photo with him, a ProCamp T-Shirt, a camper goodie bag among other prizes.

Spots are still available for the camp, which costs $249 a player. For more information and to register, visit www.CampMelo.com.

 

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Harlem Magic Masters perform for kids at York College


| editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Charles Osborn

CHARLES OSBORN

As Jay Bryant, the brains behind the Harlem Magic Masters basketball and the emcee of its events, called out the name of each member of his team, a gymnasium filled with 300 campers from a half dozen organizations at York College on July 24 went ballistic.

The children visited the school to see athletic acts by the Magic Masters, a basketball entertainment group. And they were rewarded with a dizzying display of dunks, alley-oops, Harlem Globetrotters-inspired hijinks and a positive message against bullying.

“Bullying is not cool, keep it out of our school!” Bryant shouted, before asking his enraptured audience to repeat it. A chorus of hundreds of elementary-aged children echoed Bryant, and explained the importance of inclusion and respect for your peers.

Anyone familiar with the history and shtick of the Globetrotters can picture what a Magic Masters show might look like, however Jay Bryant and his father Jack, who founded the organization in 2008, have incorporated a message to their core youth audience that resonates with adult community leaders.

“The message is extremely important to us,” Bryant explained. “When we started this organization, it was to help schools to raise money. Now we are trying to help spread positive messages to our youth. The main message here is sportsmanship and respect. There is no place for bullying.”

Although none of the names Bryant shouts, such as “’The Punisher, Roderick Burnett” or “Cliff ‘Jetblue’ Malone,” carry particular fame, each member of the Magic Masters is a certifiable basketball veteran, and all of them know how to put on a show.

Bryant has been traveling with the Magic Masters up and down the Eastern seaboard to put on shows and reach out to impressionable youth groups and to lend positive support. They have traveled to elementary, middle and high schools in New Hampshire, South Carolina and Maine.

“What I hope the kids get out of it is adhering to the message, to try to make friends instead of bullying or alienating peers,” Bryant said. “Everyone has an individual talent; we encourage students to find it and to use it to make friends.”

Although not everyone’s talent is high flying basketball, it acts as an entertaining and positive medium with which to garner attention, particularly when the Magic Masters pit themselves against the camp counselors who attempt to wrangle campers on a daily basis.

One of those counselors, Shaniqua Edwards with the University Settlement Camp from Brooklyn, appreciated the message Bryant and his organization have been working to spread.

“I think it’s a great message, especially the rhyming quote. I’m going to take that back to my kids and apply it,” Edwards said. “It’s especially good that they’re teaching this while playing basketball, because now I’ll have the kids talk about anti-bullying before they play basketball.”

 

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Nets score keeper reflects on basketball tenure, Bayside ties


| mstumpf@homereporter.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Terence M. Cullen

Herb Teretsky, 67, does not think of himself as a superstar.

He has kept score for the Nets for the past 47 years and plans to work four more years to reach a career benchmark.

The dedicated score keeper has not missed a game since 1984.

He was born and raised in Brownsville, Brooklyn and now lives in Bayside.

“Being a scorekeeper for the Nets is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get,” he said, quoting the famous line from “Forrest Gump.”

His career has included many ups and downs along the way. He has traveled the world and formed relationships with superstars like Shaquille O’Neal, Michael Jordan and Julius “Dr. J” Erving.

Teretsky has also racked up points in the literary world, writing about the experiences and acquaintances he has made during his journeys.

In his 2010 book “Basketball and Life,” he wrote about the people who mattered to them going back to when he became involved in basketball at age 21.

“It was a great undertaking and a lot of fun,” Teretsky said of the book. He also wrote 200 poems in a period of two months. He described that publication as “simply private and personal thoughts.”

Teretsky said he tried his best to make readers feel like they are sitting courtside and working with some of the greatest athletes in the world.

“I’m not the player, I’m just there to keep score,” he added.

Teretsky’s career highlights include mentions in numerous halls of fame. But his career has seen its share of tragedy, as when his friend the Croatian professional basketball player Drazen Petrovic died in a car accident at the age 28. Teretsky said the death of Petrovic, who was also Teretsky’s son’s hero, created a “horrible situation for the team.”

During his more than four decades so far with the Nets, Teretsky has been the official scorer for

NBA games in Japan, Mexico City and Canada. He has scored the NBA Hall of Fame’s exhibition game in Springfield, Massachusetts. While building his career as the NBA’s preeminent official scorer, Teretsky also coached touring teams in Israel, Greece, Belgium and France, winning the prestigious Tournoi Internationals in 1984.

“This last year may have been the best year of my career,” Teretsky said.

Teretsky with an autographed basketball to commemorate the Nets’ 1976 American Basketball Association Championship.

 

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Far Rockaway basketball tournament aims to stop violence


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

Far Rockaway is fighting its reputation of violence through a program that brings youth together and puts them under one roof.

The Stack Bundles basketball tournament kicked of its second year earlier this month and will continue through the summer. Twelve teams of 10 players each are traveling the peninsula and breaking territorial barriers. All the athletes are age 18 and over.

“We want to spread the word so these kids get it. Right now, they don’t get it,” said tournament founder Manny Fiallo, who is also outreach coordinator for the Police Athletic League (PAL) in Far Rockaway and a parent coordinator at the Department of Education (DOE).

Fiallo said that in Far Rockaway, people get very protective of their respective areas.

“If you’re from Edgemere, why can’t you go to Redfern?” he said. “We want to bring everybody together.”

Last year, Fiallo got the idea of creating something to “represent the neighborhood, something everyone could look forward to,” according to Fiallo’s partner Lakia Echols.

Stack Bundles was a rapper who lived in Redfern and died from gun violence. Fiallo said the Bundles name is well respected around the peninsula, so he called on it for a stop-the-violence effort and created the tournament.

“It’s great competition,” said returning player David Bostick. “It gives us a reason to do something good for the neighborhood.”

“Plus, it’s bragging rights,” he added.

When the second week for the tournament began, over 100 people from the neighborhood came to watch. Community members from toddlers to seniors were in the audience cheering on the players.

“A lot of kids came out and watched us play,” Bostick said. “After school, kids don’t necessarily have something to do. This gets them off the street.”
Bostick added that it is beneficial for younger kids to see older guys from different areas getting along.

At the tournament, youths affected by violence spoke to the audience and opened up about their experiences. People who lost their parents shared their stories and received support from people all over the peninsula.

Echols said once he and Fiallo have participants at the tournament, they can get their attention and show them the PAL program has job and parent training, too.

Deshawna Thompson-Banrey is a coach at this year’s tournament. She works with Fiallo and said Stack Bundles simply gives people something to do and gets them off the street.

“Right now, they’re doing something productive. This is a safe place,” she said.

The games will continue every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday through the summer.

 

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Flushing High School hoops star scores 1,000th career point


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

A Flushing High School hoops star has netted her 1,000th point.

Erica Redwood, 17, a senior on the school’s varsity girls basketball team, hit the milestone bucket during her last high school home game this January. She is the second in the school to reach the lofty mark since 2006.

“That was my biggest accomplishment this year,” said Redwood, of Jamaica. “I was surprised I did it. I didn’t even know until my coach called time out and told me.”

The point guard and co-captain for the Lady Red Devils said she set her mind to reach the goal at the end of last year, when she was told she was only 200 points away from joining the elite group of city student athletes to reach that target.

“You have to put in the work every game, but you try not to think about it. You just try to score,” Redwood said. “I was like, ‘Finally!’ It was a lot of relief.”

The team’s top scorer could have banked double the amount of points by now, her head coach Carla Nasso said. But Redwood constantly looks to pass the ball instead of taking shots.

“Erica has worked hard her whole career here,” Nasso said. “Every year, she has gotten better and better. To watch her play is just a pleasure. She always gives 125 percent on the court.”

Redwood also maintained a 90 average this year while carrying her team to the third round of the playoffs. Her total amount of accomplishments, Nasso said, is very rare for a high school athlete.

“It’s a difficult feat to accomplish. There are very, very few athletes that do it throughout the city,” the coach said.

The high flyer said she plans to take her talent to a Division II school, focusing on her sports management major, before playing in bigger leagues.

“This is mind-blowing,” Redwood said. “I didn’t think it was possible.”

 

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PSAL basketball roundup


| hzwillenberg@queenscourier.com

The Bayside Commodores improved to 5-0 by beating the Forest Hills Rangers (0-4) by a score of 85-65. Senior Austin Williams led the way for the Commodores scoring 29 points. Senior Cantrell Barker scored 18 points. Senior Gagandeep had a double-double with 16 points and 13 rebounds. Junior Daqauise Andrews scored 14 points. Next up for the Commodores will be the Benjamin Cardozo Judges (3-0).

In their last game, the Thomas Edison Engineers (3-2) beat the Flushing High School Red Devils (1-2) 67-29. For the Engineers, senior Jaleel Charles had a double-double, scoring 19 points while pulling down 14 rebounds. Senior Nosike Obanya scored 19 points as well. Junior Jediah Greene scored 12 points while dishing out five assists. For the Red Devils, not one player reached double figures; sophomore Shahiem Greene led the team with eight points. Next up or the Engineers will be the Rangers.

The John Adams Spartans (3-1) lost their last game to the Pathways College Prep Trailblazers (3-1) by a score of 85-55. For the Trailblazers, senior Sam Annorh Jr. had a game-high 30 points. Junior Izaha Jackson added 18 points while pulling down seven rebounds. Senior Jamel Holmes scored 15 points to go along with nine boards. Senior Romario Fletcher had a double-double with 12 points and 11 rebounds. For the Spartans, senior Markell French scored 17 points, pulled down nine rebounds and dished out six assists. Senior Ahmed Kone was the only other Spartan to score in double figures with 11 points. Next up for the Spartans will be the Grover Cleveland Beavers (0-3).

The Campus Magnet Bull-Dogs (2-2) beat the Martin Van Buren Vee Bees (0-4) by a score of 54-46. Junior Noah Vickers led the Bull-Dogs with 17 points. Senior Tyrell Fields was second on the team with 15 points. Senior Alton Bennett scored 11 points and had a team-high seven rebounds. For the Vee Bees senior Trevor Newman led the team with 15 points. Senior Brian Agard was second on the team with 14 points while senior Miles Banks had a game high 12 rebounds.

 

PSAL basketball roundup


| hzwillenberg@queenscourier.com

The John Adams Spartans (1-0) beat the Richmond Hill Lions (0-1) in the first game of the season by a score of 66-45. The Spartans who outscored the Lions in each of the first three quarters, road the strength of their incredible start. The Spartans shutout the Lions 15-0 in the first quarter. Senior Ahmed Kone led the Spartans with a double-double scoring 17 points while grabbing 15 rebounds. Senior Markell French recorded a double-double as well, scoring 13 points and dishing out 11 assists while also pulling down six rebounds. Seniors Simeon Hall and Ishmael Nausrudeen added 10 points each. The Lions were led by junior Kevin Baksh who scored 17 points. The only other player in double figures was senior Paramvir Singh with 12 points. The Spartans will play the Hillcrest Hawks in their next matchup.

The Bayside Commodores (1-0) beat the Thomas Edison Engineers (0-1) by a score of 69-57. For the Commodores senior Cantrell Barker led the team with 22 points. Junior Daquise Andrews added 19 points to go along with six rebounds. Senior Austin Williams scored 12 points while senior Brandon King scored 10. Next up for the Commodores will be the Flushing High School Red Devils.

The Campus Magnet Bull-Dogs (1-0) bested the Forest Hills Rangers (0-1) 65-50. Junior Nohah Vickers led the Bull-Dogs with 25 points. Senior Tyrell Fields scored 16 points while Sophomore Ramel Powers added 10. Next up for the Bull-Dogs will be the Engineers.

The Springfield Golden Eagles (1-0) beat the Pathways College Prep Trailblazers (0-1) by a score of 61-57. The Golden Eagles found themselves down at halftime by a score of 30-19. The Golden Eagles then went on a tear in the third quarter outscoring the Trailblazers by a score of 23-6. The Golden Eagles were led by junior Dupree McBrayer who had 20 points to go along with eight rebounds and seven assists. Juniors Jason Deochan and Tyree Lynch had 16 and 11 points, respectively. For the Trailblazers senior Sam Annorh Jr. led the team with 18 points. Sophomore Noel King Wicks scored 12 points to go along with his eight rebounds. The Trailblazers will play the High School For Construction Red Hawks in their next game.

QC’s Outstanding Frosh ready for year 2


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Carla Pennolino

BY CARLA PENNOLINO

Reggie Miller enjoyed a Hall of Fame basketball career with the Indiana Pacers after altering his shot at a young age because his older sister, Cheryl — also a Hall of Famer — would always block it.

Abe Akanmu of the Queens College men’s basketball team can relate to the star’s beginnings.

“I got into basketball because my older sister used to play and I wanted to do everything just like her,” Akanmu said. “I fell in love with the game and the rest is history.”

The standout sophomore started playing basketball at age five and the experience has shown throughout his hard work, dedication and leadership inside Fitzgerald Gym, QC’s home court.

Akanmu received East Coast Conference All-Rookie honors as well as a QC Outstanding Freshman award last year. The point guard averaged 8.0 points per game and dished out 35 assists in only 13 games played; he missed much of the early and middle portions of the season due to a knee injury. He received East Coast Conference Rookie of the Week honors on November 14, 2011 and later scored a season-high 25 points against St. Thomas Aquinas on February 1.

Last year, explained Akanmu, was an up and down season not only for him, but for the entire squad. After starting off the season strong with a winning record, the team faltered and ended with a 4-22 mark. A torn PCL in his left knee robbed the Staten Island-native of 13 games but he plans on coming back and helping lead the team toward a much better ending this time around.

“The goal is always to win the championship,” said Akanmu. “The key is to take it step by step. This year, we need to focus on getting into the playoffs and then we will take it from there.”

The guard loves the game for its competitive nature, which fuels his drive toward greatness.

“I hate losing, but love the game. It’s what I care about,” he said.

As a junior at Xaverian High School, the political science major knew he wanted to be a QC Knight.

“Head coach Kyrk Peponakis recruited me to be a big part of the team,” said Akanmu. “I like being a leader and always want to be.”

Peponakis recognized Akanmu’s potential in high school and wanted the 5’11” guard to be an integral part of the Knights’ future.

“He is a solid all-around guard who can not only shoot but defend,” said Peponakis. “He knows the game very well and he is a leader on the court.”

Akanmu’s most memorable basketball achievement, in fact, occurred in that same junior year. The Xaverian squad beat three nationally ranked high schools — Christ the King, Bishop Loughlin and Rice — during the 2009-10 season.

“We beat top teams in the nation,” said Akanmu. “That was big for me.”

A similar scenario can play out for Akanmu and the Knights this season as LIU-Post was predicted to repeat as ECC champions in a preseason poll.

In the future, he can’t see himself abandoning his love of the sport, instead he envisions himself as a coach or running a camp or clinic. He cannot let his passion go.

“Basketball teaches you a lot about life,” he explained. “It teaches you to work as a team, work ethic, responsibility, discipline and how to listen.”

When the Knights’ conference season tips off Saturday, December 1 at Mercy College, Akanmu will be sporting a symbolic jersey number.

“I chose number one because I want to be the best,” Akanmu said.

From the mound to the hardwood, Amir Garrett gears up for the basketball season


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

While his teammates reconvened in Queens for “summer school,” Amir Garrett was training with another team. Luckily, he didn’t have to change the colors on his uniform.

Garrett, a 22nd round draft pick of the Cincinnati Reds in 2011, spent the summer training with the baseball team as part of an agreement that lets him play basketball at St. John’s. Garrett averaged about eight points a game in basketball last year, but can also throw a fastball in the 90s as a pitcher.

After joining the Johnnies halfway through last season because of ineligibility, Garrett adjusted within a month and found his groove in the game. This time around, he said, the process of switching from hurling the small ball to shooting the big ball was rusty, but quicker.

“It’s just something I have,” he said. “When I leave and go play one sport, I pick up on it right away.”

Garrett said he learned a lot from joining the team last year as one of five starting freshmen and getting a full year this year will tighten his skills.

“But after the first week-and-a-half [to] two weeks … it was a pretty tough transition but I made the best of it,” he said. “I picked up from where I left off because you know I came in so late in the season, I was kind of nervous. I think it carried over to this year because I get to play at the start of the season.”

And while Garrett’s wearing red and white for St. John’s he won’t discuss baseball.

“When I’m in baseball, no basketball; when I’m in basketball, no baseball.”

That didn’t stop Garrett, however, from sighing and shaking his head when asked about his reaction from the Reds’ elimination from this year’s postseason.

John Starks and St. John’s Dribbles for a Cure


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence M. Cullen

In front of nearly 400 students, children and family members, St. John’s men’s basketball coach Steve Lavin stood in his trademark black pants and white sneakers. His focus wasn’t basketball, the upcoming season or the string of new Dribbles recruits he has ushered in.

Instead, Lavin reminded the crowd that cancer, in one way or another, affects everyone sooner or later.

“Cancer will touch everyone at some point in your lifetime,” he said. “Whether it’s you personally going through that battle, just the probabilities, the law of averages, a sibling, a mother or father, a grandfather, someone in the neighborhood, someone that is a good friend. It’s going to touch all of us at some point.”

Lavin, who last year underwent successful surgery for prostate cancer, was one of several St. John’s sports officials who took part in the school’s second “Dribble for the Cure,” held on Saturday, September 22 to raise money for the Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation. Among those who came out to support the cause were former longtime coaches Lou Carnesecca and Jack Kaiser, women’s basketball coach Joe Tartamella and New York Knicks alum John Starks.

At press time, the event raised around $25,000 for research, according to the school.

Taking a break from training for their upcoming seasons, players on the men’s and women’s basketball teams took part in the dribble, which circled around the school’s campus before reconvening at their home court in Carnesecca Arena.

One of those players, guard Phil Greene, said taking the time out to participate in an event like this really benefited the kids who were battling cancer.

“Giving back to the kids, you give them something to look forward to,” he said. “Giving the time out of our day, it’s nothing because they’re going through a lot of turmoil right now. It just makes you feel good, because they look up to us and we just give them something just to look forward to.”

Starks, who has lost several relatives to cancer, said he lost his grandmother, mother and sister to breast cancer and could empathize what it was like to battle the disease.

“I understand what the families go through, and it’s great to see we’re all here and understanding that this fight is never, never, never ending,” he said.

Lavin, who before the event confirmed to reporters that he is now cancer free, told the participants that their attendance was inspiring and should drive others to support the fight against cancer.

“Clearly, this is an example of the human spirit, and that’s what this is really a celebration of,” he said. “Those that support loved ones that are struggling with the dreaded disease are showing compassion, and compassion is part of the human spirit. Your time is well spent today and I want you to pat yourself on the back for showing up, showing a great example for others to follow and creating great synergy.”

Queens Knicks fans react to Jeremy Lin’s departure


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Knicks fans are saying the team’s decision to end Linsanity is pure insanity.

“I’m disappointed,” said Arthur Garfinkel, a business owner in Bayside. “I think one of the key pieces is to have a great point guard. In his stint he [Lin] actually dominated in the league. Now they’ve replaced him with Raymond Felton, who is 20 pounds overweight. Without Lin I think they have no chance, but with him they had a chance.”

The New York Knicks chose not to match the Houston Rockets offer sheet  that is worth more than $25 million and contained the “poison pill” third year worth nearly $15 million.  The team had until midnight to make a decision after the offer sheet was delivered this weekend.

“It’s disappointing, because it was a nice, little run when he was plugged into the line-up and it brought excitement to New York and the Garden,” said Whitestone local Chris Evans. “We’ll see what he [James Dolan] has up his sleeves. He always seems to hurt the team rather than help.”

Linsanity took over New York City and spread throughout the country during February as Lin led the Knicks on a winning streak upon entering the starting lineup.  Lin’s run landed him on the cover of Sports Illustrated back-to-back issues as well as being named one of Time‘s “100 Most Influential People.”

Jeremy Lin signed onto Twitter shortly after the move became official to thank Knicks fans.

“Much love and thankfulness to the Knicks and New York for your support this past year…easily the best year of my life ‪#ForeverGrateful‬.”

In 25 games as a starter Lin averaged 18.2 points per game and 7.7 assists.

With the Knicks likely to be over the salary cap during Lin’s third year, his salary would have cost the team more than $40 million due to the luxury tax.

Nearly 15,000 fans signed a petition urging management to keep Lin in New York.

“Jeremy Lin is the best thing that has happened to New York Knicks basketball in the last 20 years,” the petition reads.  “Don’t let Jeremy Lin go — match the Rockets’ offer.”

Some fans realized this is just the industry at work.

“It’s a little upsetting, but money talks,” said Queens resident Scott B. “It’s the nature of the business.”

— Additional reporting by Liam La Guerre