Tag Archives: aspca

ASPCA hosting adoption event at 105th Precinct in Queens Village


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of ASPCA

The 105th Precinct and ASPCA are teaming up this weekend in Queens Village to help some dogs and cats find a loving home.

This Sunday the public is invited to come and meet adoptable dogs and cats from the ASPCA Adoption Center in Manhattan from 12 to 4 p.m at the precinct’s parking lot, located at 92-08 222nd St.

All adoption fees during the event will be 50 percent off and all available cats and dogs will be spayed/neutered, micro-chipped, vaccinated, behaviorally assessed and provided an ID tag free of charge.

Additionally, adoption counselors from the ASPCA will be on-site to help answer questions about temperament and personality in order to make the best possible match.

Potential adopters should bring one government-issued photo ID (i.e. driver’s license, passport, military ID, or non-driver ID), proof of address and contact information for a personal reference. Adopters must be 21 or older.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: Periods of rain. High near 50. Winds W at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of rain 90%. Monday night: Partly cloudy. Low 12. Winds W at 20 to 30 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Anthony Cekay Organ Trio, Sam Minae, Matthew Snow Band at LIC Bar

The Anthony Cekay Organ Trio, Sam Minae, Matthew Snow Band will all perform at LIC Bar, located at 45-58 Vernon Boulevard, starting at 7:30 p.m.

Deep freeze coming to tri-state area this week

You might have been able to go around without your scarf and hat on Sunday, and a lighter jacket might even be warranted Monday morning. Read more: CBS New York/AP

New York set to allow limited use of medical marijuana

New York would become the 21st state to allow medical use of marijuana under an initiative Gov. Andrew Cuomo will unveil this week. Read more: NBC New York

Wave of lawsuits over deadly Metro-North derailment

A good Samaritan who tried to help an injured stranger on the ill-fated Metro-North train is one of the more than 30 new people who plan to sue after last month’s deadly derailment, The Post has learned. Read more: New York Post 

ASPCA closes storied enforcement unit in NYC

For 147 years, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has served as the primary law enforcement agency for animal abuse laws in New York City. Read more: NBC New York

Report: Most NYC murder victims in 2013 knew their killers

Of the 334 murders in New York City in 2013, it appears only 29 victims did not know their killer. Read more: CBS New York

 

12-year-old girl arrested for allegedly killing kitten in Ozone Park


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

A Queens girl has been arrested after she allegedly threw a kitten in front of a car, killing it.

The girl is accused of tossing the gray tabby into oncoming traffic at the corner of 102nd Street and 101st Avenue in Ozone Park on September 11, according to American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) spokesperson Bret Hopman.

ASPCA officers arrested the girl on Thursday and charged her with aggravated cruelty to animals. Hopman said the case has been referred to Family Court.

The ASPCA found out about the incident after a witness called its Humane Law Enforcement Department.

“The callousness demonstrated in this case is certainly disturbing. We can only hope that this young lady takes responsibility for her actions and understands that cruelty to animals will not be tolerated in our society,” said Stacy Wolf, senior vice president of the ASPCA’s Anti-Cruelty Group.

According to the New York Daily News, the girl, a 12-year-old from Queens, did not own the pet, and took the three-month cat named Little Man from a couple who said they didn’t know her.

 

 RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

Displaced pets find comfort after Sandy


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ASPCA

Caring for five dogs requires patience. Caring for five dogs during a superstorm requires a miracle.

When Sandy struck, Kathleen Fessmann and her quintet of dogs — Yogi, Java, Rannie, Katie and Mocha — remained in their Broad Channel home, waiting out the storm. With nowhere to take the pooches, she figured they would stick it out until the rain and wind had passed. The storm wasn’t supposed to be that bad, she thought.

The water rose seven feet, flooding her house, knocking over the fence in her backyard and capsizing the fuel tank in her basement. When two of the dogs became sick from breathing in fumes from the spilled fuel tank, she knew they needed to leave.

Since the storm hit, nearly 300 animals have been rescued by American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) responders, and through pet supply distribution and mobile wellness clinics, the organization assisted nearly 16,000 animals in New York City and Long Island.

“We recognize the great need to help pet owners during this difficult time by temporarily caring for their animals while they get back on their feet,” said Tim Rickey, senior director of ASPCA Field Investigations and Response. “The ASPCA is working with local and national animal welfare agencies to assist animals affected by the storm, and we’re grateful to have these valued partners helping us manage the emergency boarding facility and provide relief for both people and pets alike.”

Temporary shelters constructed in the Waldbaum’s parking lot at 112-15 Beach Channel Drive in Belle Harbor and Rockapup at 145 Beach 116th Street in Rockaway Park held displaced Queens pets for several weeks after the storm before they were moved to the more permanent kennels in the Bedford–Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, which will remain open until December 17.

“The emergency boarding facility allows pet owners the ability to get their lives back together while knowing that their pets are being taken care of,” said ASPCA spokesperson Kelly Krause.

All five of Fessman’s dogs were sent to an interim home at the Sean Casey Animal Shelter in Windsor Terrace before being moved to the ASPCA shelter in Bedford–Stuyvesant. While at the shelter, veterinarians discovered that two of the dogs had enlarged lymph nodes, a side-effect from breathing in the fuel fumes. The ASPCA provided free treatment for both ill animals.

Fessman, a registered nurse, visits her canine clan in their temporary Brooklyn home several times a week. She recently hired a contractor to begin repairs on her home, estimating the dogs will be back in their rightful residence in three weeks.

“It’s been terrible. It’s been bad. I just feel bad for them,” Fessman said. “I can talk about it and get it out of my system but it’s them I feel bad for. It’s just really sad for them, but they’re being taken care of really well.”