Tag Archives: art

This Morning’s Headlines


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

DOE takes two ‘politically connected’ schools off the chopping block, axes 24 others

The city’s education-policy board voted just before midnight last night to close and then immediately reopen two dozen schools with new names and new staffers in an unprecedented move that could displace more than 1,000 teachers. Two last-minute reprieves were granted yesterday before the vote, and they went to a pair of politically backed schools — Grover Cleveland HS in Queens, which counts state Assembly Education Committee Chair Cathy Nolan as an alumna, and Bushwick Community HS in Brooklyn, which garnered several vocal supporters, including Council Speaker Christine Quinn. Read More: New York Post

 

Air man’s dogged pursuit

The Port Authority worker who got down on his hands and knees to try to rescue a canny canine who wandered onto a busy runway at La Guardia airport Wednesday is a cat lover who is allergic to dogs, he lamented. But Paul Malichek, 57, didn’t want to spook Byrdie — a 14-month-old Rhodesian ridgeback who had escaped her travel crate and turned the runway into her own private dog run — so he crawled toward her as jets idled nearby. Read More: New York Post

Occupy Protesters Turn Focus To Mounting U.S. Student Debt

Occupy Wall Street protestors gathered in Union Square in Manhattan on Wednesday to mark the day they say the U.S. student debt reached $1 trillion dollars and to draw attention to what they called the financial sector’s “predatory” student loan market. The Federal Reserve disputes the figure, saying U.S. student debt is currently $870 billion. President Barack Obama and his Republican opponent Mitt Romney have called attention to the issue on the campaign trail to try to court the college-age vote. U.S. Senate Democrats and Republicans in the House of Representatives have proposed separate bills to keep interest rates for poor and middle class students at the current level for another year. Read More: NY1


 

Mother, Sister Of Queens Terror Suspect Testify On His Behalf

The mother and sister of a Queens man accused of plotting a terror attack in the city gave emotional testimony for the defense in Brooklyn federal court on Wednesday. Alisa Medunjanin choked back tears as she talked about her brother, Adis, and the raid on their home. She recounted the story of dozens of agents with weapons storming their sixth-floor apartment to arrest her brother. Alisa said she thought her brother had gone to Pakistan to get married. Prosecutors, who wrapped up their arguments earlier Wednesday, said Adis Medunjanin was there receiving Al-Qaida terror training. Read More: NY1


 

Rapper Talib Kweli emcees at St. John’s University

Like any great rapper, Talib Kweli knows how to freestyle. Without any notes or prompts, the Brooklyn native rattled off a first-person history of hip hop music to a captive audience of more than 400 students at St. John’s University on Tuesday. “Hip hop is such a folk thing,” the 36-year-old lyricist told the Daily News. “It speaks directly to the people and the language that they are using right now.” Read More: Daily News

 

While NY Giants sit tight with No. 32 pick, NFC East division rivals Washington Redskins, Philadelphia Eagles and Dallas Cowboys load up to challenge Big Blue

 

One of the crucial issues for the Giants as they go through the offseason getting ready to defend their Super Bowl title is whether they indeed have an identity crisis. Are they the Giants who struggled to become the first team to not only win the NFC East with a mediocre 9-7 record but the first team to win the Super Bowl at 9-7? Or are they the team that raised its game to an unimaginable level in the playoffs and beat the Falcons at home in the wild-card game and then the Packers and 49ers on the road — the two best NFC teams in the regular season — before finishing off their incredible run with another Super Bowl victory over the Patriots? Read More: Daily News

 

‘Draw’ing inspiration from Astoria


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

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A blank canvas – lacking a defined identity and purpose – can be a daunting task for any artist. Many grow to hate its vacant stare, praying for inspiration to end the monotony of its colorless complexion. Often, it can lead to hasty or unimaginative work.

Such dilemmas are nonexistent for Louie Gasparro, who adores his canvas as much as, or perhaps more than, his work – because his canvas is his city.

Gasparro, an urban contemporary street artist born and raised in Astoria, found his feet in art in a nontraditional manner.

“When I was a kid, I would ride the ‘RR’ train to Queensboro Plaza and the No. 7 to Main Street, and that’s where I first saw bubble writing and cartoons on the train,” Gasparro said. “The fact that it was moving on a train, it was like a flying cartoon in front of me.”

Following his fascination for the flying images he observed, Gasparro grew to create icons of his own. He began visiting train yards after dark to spray paint – a practice he continued for roughly six years. He would draw his tag name, “KR.ONE,” or whatever images he viewed in his mind’s eye, aiming to evoke the same joy in other subway riders that he experienced as a kid.

“I tried to take this flowing and fantastical lettering and combine it with my graffiti style lettering,” he said. “Graffiti when it began was name based. It was all about how many different ways I could draw my name and bend the alphabet.”

In his early years, Gasparro credits cartoons, comic books and the rock and roll album covers his brothers gave him for motivating his artistic creations. Artists he admired include Salvador Dali and Pablo Picasso.

A classic western Queens kid, Gasparro received his entire education in Astoria and Long Island City schools. His art edification he left to his own studies, having never received any official training.

As Gasparro grew in age, and as an artist, he never struggled to find inspiration – wherever he looked, it was in view.

“I’m inspired by good people, truth, music and nature,” said the 46 year old. “I get inspired easily, I guess because I still have this childlike approach to it all. I get inspired so easily because there are so many things I appreciate that are all around me.”

His greatest inspiration, however, will always be his hometown – where he discovered his craft and found his first professional work as an artist.

“Where I grew up was the perfect vantage point for me to view all the different graffiti styles happening at the time,” he said. “From 1974 to 1983, I absorbed all of that which was going on with graffiti. I wouldn’t trade when and where I grew up for anything. I grew up around the corner from Kaufmann Astoria Studios. I met Aerosmith when I was 12. I saw Michael Jackson and Diana Ross making “The Whiz” when I was a kid. I was immersed in art growing up – it was around every corner I turned.”

Beginning in the early 1980s, Gasparro was commissioned to paint murals across western Queens, and he was particularly well known in Astoria. He painted frescoes for neighborhood spots such as the Beebe Diner, Boutique 92 and a schoolyard located at 28th Street and 36th Avenue in Dutch Kills, affectionately known as 204 Park. He has also been featured numerous times at L.I.C.’s 5Pointz Aerosol Art Center – an outdoor art exhibit space considered by many to be the Mecca of graffiti.

Gasparro’s most common graffiti topics are assorted lettering fonts – which he considers the purist form of the art – and subjects pertaining to New York. Along with his urban contemporary street art, Gasparro also enjoys creating abstract and fantasy pieces.

What he relishes most, he says, is the process of combining many genres and forming a free flowing finished product – allowing the piece to come together on its own.

“Fifty percent of the time I’ll be bold, and I’ll look at the canvas and just go immediately. I just go for it,” Gasparro said. “I get in an improvisational flow – like jazz. You have to take chances and you will make mistakes, but you have to make mistakes to achieve perfection.”

Gasparro has also pursued a career in his second passion – music. He joined the band Murphy’s Law in 1982 and traveled the world performing as a drummer. Regardless of where he went, his true love was never far away.

“I went to Europe and I was amazed. Europe really grabbed graffiti and held it to its bosom and nurtured it,” Gasparro said. “Europeans have had art and culture for centuries, so they have more of a vision. America is a much younger country when you compare it to a country like Greece. Graffiti is huge in Greece, Italy and Germany.”

Despite its international popularity, Gasparro is proud that graffiti is from New York, and his neighborhood was a leader in the art’s rise to fame.

“Graffiti is a worldwide phenomenon. It is probably the biggest art movement in the world, and it is from New York,” he said. “The phenomenon that it has become is because of New York. I don’t know of any other art movement that so many people were doing at the same time.”

Gasparro does not appreciate the negative connotations often applied to the word “graffiti.” The art was never about breaking the law for him, but meant something more than the paint in the can.

“When people asked me why we were doing graffiti, I told them we had to express ourselves,” he said. “What we felt was so deep that we had to go big. We were expressing ourselves in a big way. There is the graffiti problem, but what about the art side? We can’t always look at the negative. Why can’t we get kids who are acting out and get them to express themselves through this art form?”

Now an accomplished artist, Gasparro is frequently commissioned to work on clothing, furniture, cars and even private homes. He has been published in several anthologies, and is currently in the process of writing a book of his own – chronicling the life and work of Don 1, an influential graffiti artist.

He was recently re-welcomed to the site of his artistic genesis, when his work was displayed in an exclusive show – Bringer of the Kolor Storm – on March 10 in L.I.C. More than 100 people attended the event – which featured Gasparro’s urban, contemporary, fantasized, graffiti-style art – and every painting was purchased. Due to its success, Gasparro is currently planning a subsequent show.

“For me to come back and do a show in my hometown, where I practiced and started – the place that turned me on to art – was amazing,” said Gasparro. “It is great that LIC has become this artistic place when an artist like me can show my stuff.”

Queens artist ties the knot


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Nicholas Ruiz

Dapper, dashing and debonair, the notoriously sophisticated bow tie has acquired an artistic injection from a Queens creative.

Nicholas Ruiz constructs imaginative bow ties from found objects, fashioning his original accessories from everything from pills to newspaper, film negatives to wine corks.

Originally from Florida, Ruiz attended college at Drexel University in Philadelphia, where he studied merchandising and design. After graduating in 2010, he moved to Forest Hills and got a job in the Special Programming and Events department at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

A chance meeting with singer Janelle Monáe in November, 2010 sparked Ruiz’s idea to create bow ties.

“She wears this fantastic bow tie in her music video ‘Tightrope,’” said Ruiz. “I started looking for a similar one in N.Y.C., but couldn’t find anything, so I decided to just make one myself.”

Ruiz revealed his first bow tie, made from colorful guitar picks, at the opening of “Picasso: Guitars 1912-1914” on February 8, 2011. Each bow tie created thereafter was inspired by exhibition openings and benefitted events Ruiz worked on during 2011 at MoMA.

“They were all created during different moments in my life in 2011, so each bow tie represents that unique moment of time,” said Ruiz.

Ruiz created the LEGO bow tie to wear to a party following The Armory Show, a modern art fair held every March in Manhattan, featuring a performance by British singer, Kate Nash. The chanteuse took a liking to Ruiz’s unique accoutrement and asked him to make a similar one for her to sport in her hair. Delighted, he obliged, and decided to define the project, assuming the challenge of designing and hand-crafting nine more bow ties.

In his spare time, Ruiz can be found spinning records at events around New York City as DJ Bow Tie Boy.

During the summer of 2012, The Bow Tie Collection (2011) will be showcased at a gallery in Fairfield, Connecticut and several of the 11 total bow ties will be available for purchase.

Ruiz also has a new collection in the works.

“My future bow ties will include tie-able forms hand stitched from cloth, denim, suede and other unique materials,” said Ruiz. “They will offer more classic looks for the office as well as zany prints if you want to spice up your style, and also more modern dapper looks for red carpets. I would absolutely love to design custom wedding bow ties for someone’s special day.”

Recently, Ruiz was asked by the Virgin Company to design an exclusive bow tie, constructed from one of their signature red balloons.

While the bow tie has long since been considered a distinguished accessory, Ruiz enjoys taking something “elitist” and creating it out of everyday objects.

“I want people to see the bow ties and feel inspired and wear them and feel confident,” said Ruiz. “The bow ties allowed me to express a bit of myself without saying a word.”

Ruiz plans to launch an online shop sometime in the fall of 2012, called www.NicholasTee.com and has since launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for it. Fans can purchase handmade bow ties made of recycled and traditional materials while browsing future collections.

FBI busts teacher’s aide for allegedly making child porn with students


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

FBI busts Brooklyn teacher’s aide for allegedly making child porn with students

A teacher’s aide at a Brooklyn school was arrested again yesterday by the FBI and charged with making child pornography videos of students he was assaulting at the grade school where he worked, authorities said today. It is the second time in the last two weeks that FBI agents have charged Taleek Brooks with offenses linked to illegally possessing films of underage children engaged in sexual acts. After his first arrest in mid-January, Brooks allegedly confessed that he had assembled more than 1,000 pornographic images of young children on his computers, according to a report filed by Brooklyn federal prosecutors. Read More: New York Post

Prosecutors have yet to convene grand jury in Cashman ‘stalker’ case

Yankees GM Brian Cashman’s alleged shake-down stalker learned some good news in Manhattan Criminal Court today: prosecutors have agreed to take more time investigating the case before convening a grand jury on possible felony grand larceny charges. Louise Meanwell, 35 — who also uses the let name Neathway — looked grim but clear-minded after making the trip from jail to court, and turned up at the defense table wearing a snug-tailored charcoal pants suit and repeatedly flipping her long blonde hair from her face. She’d last come to court Feb. 3, and had that time treated news photographers to a slide-show stack of emotions and poses, rolling her eyes, tearing up and laughing in turns. Read More: New York Post

Hotel art thief is prison-bound

A compulsive fine art fan is going to prison for at least a year after getting caught lifting hundreds of thousands of dollars in paintings from the lobby walls of the Carlyle and Chambers hotels in Manhattan. Mark Lugo, 31, was a restaurant waiter with caviar taste — as much as $700,000 in stolen art and fine wine was recovered from his Hoboken, NJ apartment when cops busted him this past summer. Lugo pleaded guilty in Manhattan Supreme Court today to one count of grand larceny in the second degree, the top charge against him. Read More: New York Post

 

Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner is trying to buy Los Angeles  Dodgers

Donald Trump’s son-in-law is making a play to buy the Los Angeles Dodgers. If successful, Jared Kushner would be the most high-profile New Yorker to own the team since Walter O’Malley, who broke Brooklyn’s heart by moving the Dodgers to L.A. before the 1958 season. Kushner, who is just 31 and married to Ivanka Trump, would also be the youngest owner in Major League Baseball. While Kushner has not said anything publicly about the bid, the editor of his newspaper — The New York Observer — gave it a thumbs up. Read More: Daily News

 

Teens charged with burglary and sexual assault in home-invasion robbery in Brooklyn

Disturbing details emerged Monday about a Brooklyn home invasion by four teens, the youngest only 13-years-old, who allegedly tied up a couple, ransacked their home and took turns sexually assaulting the woman. As one robber went to get cash with stolen ATM cards, the three others repeatedly forced the 22-year-old victim to perform oral sex, threatening to kill her if she refused, prosecutors said. “The defendants are known members of the Brower gang,” Assistant District Attorney Wilfredo Cotto said in Brooklyn Criminal Court. Read More: Daily News

Time to Create: Artist Violet Baxter paints L.I.C.


| smosco@queenscourier.com

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Art is comprised mainly of two elements: time and raw materials. While the art itself is physically constructed with materials – paint, clay, trash, whatever – it is time that decides whether or not the art lives on. Prehistoric people decided to paint on cave walls, and time decided to preserve that work for modern eyes.

Contrary to the process in which art becomes art, an artist becomes an artist through a mix of sheer will and talent. If the artist relies on time, they’ll be left with a blank canvas and a pile of unpaid bills.

Artist Violet Baxter grew up as a shy, yet promising youngster in the Bronx. Her grade school teachers noticed her talents and saw fit to recommend she take art classes on Saturdays. A fourth grade teacher, Evelyn Licht, befriended the young Baxter and helped her score her first “art job” – designing cake boxes on weekends when she was 13 years old.

“We stayed close until her death,” said Baxter, whose studio resides in the Wills Building on 21st Street. “She was responsible for my first job and my first gallery exhibitions.”

An educated and trained artist, Baxter graduated from high school and went on to Hunter College for two years of night classes. She graduated with honors from the Cooper Union Art School after five years of night classes and continued her schooling at Columbia University studying under renowned American artist Ralph Mayer.

In 1983, she took a studio in Union Square, where she stayed until skyrocketing rents drove her to L.I.C.

“Here my windows face a new school called Mason Tenders Training, highways that lead to the Queensboro Bridge, the El train, Silvercup Studios with its sign and a wide sky,” she said. “This is my subject matter. I have made closely observed drawings of this view, that sets it somewhat in memory. From the drawings I made watercolors and oils.”

Baxter said that she doesn’t know what the finished work will look like when she begins a piece. Again, time decides the finished project.

“It can take a long time to resolve a painting, sometimes years,” she said. “It is put aside until I can see if there is something else for it. There are always paintings around my studio in this state.”

The state of Baxter’s ideal painting studio lends to the reflective quality of her work. She seeks a quiet place with a view to achieve the quiet, contemplative narrative revealed in her paintings.

“I keep in touch with myself in my work. Like music, the themes are within the work,” she said. “I need a block of time to get into the work. It starts with problems to solve and at some point time dissolves. I often work at night – night light and self reflections, outside and inside, are what interests me.”

Among LIC artists, Baxter is most interested in Elinore Schnurr, Juvenal Reiss, Karen Fitzgerald and her new friend, Orestes Gonzalez. She feels one of the most important galleries in L.I.C. is the Jeffrey Leder Gallery. Her paintings were shown there through last season, and much of her work will be on exhibit in the upper gallery beginning Sunday, February 19, with a reception from 4 to 7 p.m. continuing through Sunday, March 11.

Baxter will continue to share her view and present images in the hopes her work will resonate with viewers. Her hard work – and the hard work of her influences – continues to payoff tenfold. Now she works with time to see her vision through.

“I have hundreds of influences, mostly artists from prehistoric time to the present, from nonobjective to representation,” she said. “My interests are with painting, as a personal touch of the hand. A drawing on a mammoth tusk seen at the Museum of Natural History still resonates, and reaches out through millennia.”

Long Island City artist blending art and photography


| smosco@queenscourier.com

Rafael Octavio Gonzalez

Far away from the static realm of everyday photography lies the work of Rafael Octavio Gonzalez. The Long Island City-bred artist puts a luminescent spin on the lens – surrounding the viewer and bringing the past and present together in one intimate, yet all-encompassing, image.

His images are currently being presented in an ongoing exhibition at Z Hotel in L.I.C. – steps away from where the artist grew up and developed his photographer’s sensibility.

“I got into photography when my brother gave me a camera back when I was in eighth grade,” said Gonzalez, who came to Queens from Columbia at seven-years-old. “Before that, I didn’t feel very artsy or have any inclination toward art at all.”

But growing up in L.I.C.’s old days – before the condos shot up – afforded Gonzalez the types of views that builds an eye for the majestic.

“I grew up on the corner of 21st Street and 44th Avenue, back when there was roof access. I used to hang out up there and there was a full view of the city because there was nothing on the waterfront. There were no tall structures,” he said. “I grew up with beautiful sunsets and sunrises and everything that happens around this piece of the city right here.”

One image he captured was a panoramic view of Manhattan from the Queens side of the East River on December 7, 2000. In the image, the sun dramatically sets just behind the World Trade Center – creating a poignant vision foreshadowing the city’s not-too-distant future.

As any art should, that panorama always elicits a response from the viewer, and for obvious reasons. The piece, called “Sunset at the Towers,” shows a striking image of the Towers outlined in a brilliant and fiery light. Gonzalez said that no matter the reaction, he wants to reach an audience so that they feel something – whether it’s love or hate.

“I’m hoping that it does bring some kind of emotion out of people,” Gonzalez said, explaining that one of his works, “Frozen,” tends to bring out an array of opinions. “Some people love it, but others are a little creeped out by it. I like it in the sense that I got to them at some level of emotion – it means the image is strong. To be able to draw some sort of emotion from someone is a very fulfilling feeling. To get someone to react to your work is the point – whether they like it or not.”

“Frozen” is part of a series of 360-degree panoramic photographs. The images play with space and time, perception and perspective. Bringing the 360-degree view within one plane suggest a single image taken at a single instant – when in reality the image came to Gonzalez over multiple frames over a period of days.

This is where Gonzalez’s technical side comes into play. He always had a technological brain – with mathematics and engineering preceding his love of photography.

“A lot of what goes into photography is highly technical when you’re putting it all together,” he said. “In many ways I think they are very linked, mathematics and life.”

Gonzalez is the first artist Z Hotel is exhibiting in their lower level Z Lounge, and they will exhibit a new artist each month in an effort to support the arts throughout the neighborhood.

And the neighborhood has changed greatly since Gonzalez moved to East Elmhurst with his wife and brother. Large buildings have popped up, blocking the view he once had as a kid. But he is not completely against such an occurrence – in fact, he wishes he was a part of it.

“I was very sad that I wasn’t in the position to buy some parts of the land there before they built on it,” he laughed. “It was kind of disappointing to see the view go away because it was such a beautiful unobstructed view, but that’s progress.”

And if he can somehow make a return to the area, he wouldn’t mind being a part of that progress.

“I dream of one day having an apartment over here,” Gonzalez said. “I grew up with this view and the ultimate way to get that part of me back would be to have a spot right up front on the waterfront.”

Through the lens of Rafael Octavio Gonzalez


| smosco@queenscourier.com

Rafael Octavio Gonzalez at Z Hotel

Far away from the static realm of everyday photography lies the work of Rafael Octavio Gonzalez. The Long Island City-bred artist puts a luminescent spin on the lens – surrounding the viewer and bringing the past and present together in one intimate, yet all-encompassing, image.

His images are currently being presented in an ongoing exhibition at Z Hotel in L.I.C. – steps away from where the artist grew up and developed his photographer’s sensibility.

“I got into photography when my brother gave me a camera back when I was in eighth grade,” said Gonzalez, who came to Queens from Columbia at seven-years-old. “Before that, I didn’t feel very artsy or have any inclination toward art at all.”

But growing up in L.I.C.’s old days – before the condos shot up – afforded Gonzalez the types of views that builds an eye for the majestic.

“I grew up on the corner of 21st Street and 44th Avenue, back when there was roof access. I used to hang out up there and there was a full view of the city because there was nothing on the waterfront. There were no tall structures,” he said. “I grew up with beautiful sunsets and sunrises and everything that happens around this piece of the city right here.”

One image he captured was a panoramic view of Manhattan from the Queens side of the East River on December 7, 2000. In the image, the sun dramatically sets just behind the World Trade Center – creating a poignant vision foreshadowing the city’s not-too-distant future.

As any art should, that panorama always elicits a response from the viewer, and for obvious reasons. The piece, called “Sunset at the Towers,” shows a striking image of the Towers outlined in a brilliant and fiery light. Gonzalez said that no matter the reaction, he wants to reach an audience so that they feel something – whether it’s love or hate.

“I’m hoping that it does bring some kind of emotion out of people,” Gonzalez said, explaining that one of his works, “Frozen,” tends to bring out an array of opinions. “Some people love it, but others are a little creeped out by it. I like it in the sense that I got to them at some level of emotion – it means the image is strong. To be able to draw some sort of emotion from someone is a very fulfilling feeling. To get someone to react to your work is the point – whether they like it or not.”

“Frozen” is part of a series of 360-degree panoramic photographs. The images play with space and time, perception and perspective. Bringing the 360-degree view within one plane suggest a single image taken at a single instant – when in reality the image came to Gonzalez over multiple frames over a period of days.

This is where Gonzalez’s technical side comes into play. He always had a technological brain – with mathematics and engineering preceding his love of photography.

“A lot of what goes into photography is highly technical when you’re putting it all together,” he said. “In many ways I think they are very linked, mathematics and life.”

Gonzalez is the first artist Z Hotel is exhibiting in their lower level Z Lounge, and they will exhibit a new artist each month in an effort to support the arts throughout the neighborhood.

And the neighborhood has changed greatly since Gonzalez moved to East Elmhurst with his wife and brother. Large buildings have popped up, blocking the view he once had as a kid. But he is not completely against such an occurrence – in fact, he wishes he was a part of it.

“I was very sad that I wasn’t in the position to buy some parts of the land there before they built on it,” he laughed. “It was kind of disappointing to see the view go away because it was such a beautiful unobstructed view, but that’s progress.”

And if he can somehow make a return to the area, he wouldn’t mind being a part of that progress.

“I dream of one day having an apartment over here,” Gonzalez said. “I grew up with this view and the ultimate way to get that part of me back would be to have a spot right up front on the waterfront.”

Check out www.panoramasbyrafael.zenfolio.com to view Gonzalez’s work.

What’s Happening This Weekend


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

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Friday, October 14 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Flushing Town Hall: The Collage Aesthetic of Louis Armstrong – In the Cause of Happiness;

EDITOR’S PICKS

Friday, October 14 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Flushing Town Hall: The Collage Aesthetic of Louis Armstrong – In the Cause of Happiness; made for an exhibition at Lincoln Center, the Louis Armstrong Collage Exhibition features reproductions of some of the remarkable collages created by Louis Armstrong affixed to the boxes of his audio tapes, and introduces audiences to this very public man who could turn his irrepressible creativity to arts other than music; visit www.flushingtownhall.com or call 718-463-7700 for more details.

November 3-13 Queens Theatre in the Park: ‘S Wonderful; five mini-musicals take audiences on an all-singing, all-dancing ride to the places, times and styles that made the Gershwins the most successful songwriting team in musical history; featuring more than 40 classic hits including “I Got Rhythm,” “Someone To Watch Over Me,” “They Can’t Take That Away From Me,” and “Rhapsody in Blue,” ‘S Wonderful will have you tapping your toes to the fascinating rhythms of George & Ira Gershwin; visit www.queenstheatre.org or call 718-760-0064.

WEEKEND EVENTS

Sunday, October 16 Queens Botanical Garden: Harvest Fest and Pumpkin Patch; Queens Botanical Garden will usher in the autumn months with the Harvest Fest & Pumpkin Patch celebration. The family-friendly event will celebrate the season with food – including barbecue from Famous Dave’s BBQ and a beer tent – live bluegrass music, storytelling, poetry readings, garden workshops and tours, children’s activities, as well as craft vendors; visit www.queensbotanical.org or call (718) 886-3800 for more information.

Sunday, October 16 Bell Boulevard: The Second Annual Bayside Village Arts and Crafts Fair; the emphasis of this year’s fair will shift slightly to the visual and performing, cultural arts with entertainment that will expand from some soft acoustic musical groups and individual local musical artisans to include some of the performing arts and dance groups based in the Bayside business district; items for sale; visit www.baysidebid.com or call 718-423-2434 for more information.

Saturday, October 15 and Sunday, October 16 Free Tours for openhousenewyork Weekend; The c. 1887 Officers’ Club, home of Bayside Historical Society, will be among some 200 architecturally-significant sites across NYC spotlighted during the 9th annual openhousenewyork Weekend, the nation’s largest architecture and design event; visit www.baysidehistorical.org or call 718-352-1548.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

7 p.m. Immaculate Conception Church in Astora: Film Festival, The Force of Evil; all are welcome to join members of the Immaculate Conception Church to watch “The Dark Knight” (Oct. 14), “Never Let Me Go” (Oct. 21) and “The Exorcist” (Oct. 28); each movie night will feature guest speakers; visit www.ic-astoria.org.
October 14-16 The Astoria/LIC International Film Festival: an exciting mix of submissions is sure to make the second annual Astoria/LIC International Film; visit www.astorialic.com for a list of films, events and venues.

4 p.m. Far Rockaway Library: The Traditional Sounds and Dance of Veracruz, Mexico; celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with the traditional sounds and dance of Veracruz, Mexico with Radio Jarocho, a New York City-based group devoted to the son jarocho and fandango traditions from southern Veracruz, Mexico; call 718-327-2549.

2:30 p.m. Hollis Library: An Afternoon of Theater; enjoy scenes from the works of modern American writers such as Neil Simon, Ivan Menchell and John Steinbeck; call 718-465-7355.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15

2-5 p.m. Community Church of Douglaston: Heaven on Earth; celebrate the rebirth and renewal of the historic 1850’s cottage at the Community Church of Douglaston; open house and tours; presented by the Douglaston and Little Neck Historical Society; visit www.dlnhs.org.

2 p.m. Flushing Library: Where the Water Lies; ancient and modern, east and west converge in music performed on Chinese and Western instruments; call 718-661-1200.

2 p.m. Flushing Library: Lung and Esophageal Cancer; Dr. Andrew J. Kaufman, assistant professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, will talk about general lung diseases, lung and esophageal cancer, care, prevention and surgery; Q&A and discussion will follow. In English with Chinese translation; call 718-661-1200.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16

3 p.m. Queensborough Performing Arts Center: Three Mo’ Tenors; conceived and directed by the highly acclaimed veteran Broadway performer, choreographer and director, Marion J. Caffey, Three Mo’ Tenors showcases the extraordinary versatility of African-American tenors who can sing it all; For more information about this event and other upcoming shows, contact the QPAC Box Office at 718-631-6311; tickets are also available online at www.visitQPAC.org.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 17

5-6:30 p.m. Campbell Dome at Queens College: A Conversation with Orhan Pamuk; the 2006 Nobel Prize winner for literature will discuss his work with a Queens College professor reflecting on the challenges of translating his work for world audiences; his appearance is part of the college’s “Year of Turkey: Exploring Past, Present, Future,” a series of cultural events taking place through June 2012; call 718-997-5000 or visit www.qc.cuny.edu.

6 p.m. Arverne Library: Pauline Jean; vocalist Pauline Jean sings classic jazz and Motown hits by groups like The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight and the Pips, and much, much more; call 718-634-4784.

2 p.m. Long Island City Library: Financial Empowerment Center; Come talk to a financial counselor and learn how to work with your credit, debt, household budget and money management in general. To register, call the Queens Financial Empowerment Center at 646-810-4050, ext. 112 and indicate that you want to register for a session at Queens Library. You can also call 3-1-1 and ask for the Financial Empowerment in Queens; you will be connected to the same phone line.

6 p.m. Long Island City Library: Applying for Benefits; learn how to apply for various benefits. This program is hands-on and library staff will assist attendees preparing to apply for benefits such as Medicaid, Safelink and food stamps; call 718-752-3700.

6:30 p.m., Windsor Park Library: Information Literacy for Kids; join the library for our first ever information literacy class for children and their parents; learn how to find books in the library and use our many wonderful resources for school projects. This program is in four required sessions and is for children in Grades 3-5; call 718-468-8300.

7 p.m. South Ozone Park Library: Help Save a Life: Learn CPR – Free On-Site Training for Adults; the FDNY Mobile CPR Training Unit provides adult CPR awareness with hands-on participation to help you learn the core skills of CPR; knowing CPR cardio-pulmonary resuscitation can make a difference in saving a family member, friend or co-worker’s life; preregistration is required; call the library or come in and sign up at the Information Desk; call 718-529-1660.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18

6:30 p.m. Queens College’s Rosenthal Library: U.S. Poet Laureate Phillip Levine; called one of America’s great narrative poets, Phillip Levine will read from his work to students, faculty and members of the community; Levine has won almost every major writing award including a Pulitzer Prize in 1995; visit www.qc.cuny.edu or visit 718-997-5000.

1:30 p.m. Queens Historical Society: Third Tuesday Movie Matinees (Growing up Queens: A Study of Childhood in Our Unique Borough); Queens Historical Society is pleased to present their newest event series, Third Tuesday Movie Matinees, featuring movies evoking childhood and celebrating memories of growing up in New York; call 718-939-0647.

2:30 p.m. Auburndale Library: Pianist David Heckendorn; a tribute to Leonid Levin, performed by Pianist David Heckendorn with music from classic American films: “The Sound of Music,” “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” “Schindler’s List,” “The Godfather,” and popular songs by the great American songwriters Gershwin, Porter and Kern.

6:30 p.m. Central Library: Your Own Business: The Nuts & Bolts of Getting Started; learn how to develop your idea into a business plan; participants will learn creating a demand for your product/service, setting goals and objectives, budgeting and timelines; identifying resources and networks, getting ready to open your doors; every Tuesday from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the Job Information Center; to register, please call 718-990-5102.

6:30 p.m. Central Library: Staying Healthy and Losing Weight Naturally in a Chemically Toxic World; Dr. Jesson Manukonda, M.D., will provide practical yet powerful lifestyle strategies for weight loss, fitness, disease prevention and natural treatments for most diseases; call 718-990-0700.

SAVE THE DATE

Sunday, October 23 at 10 a.m. Reform Temple of Forest Hills: Talk on Homelessness in America; a discussion regarding how homelessness can relate to trauma, violence and mental illness; to register, visit www.rtfh.org or call the temple at 718-261-2900.

Wednesday, October 26 from 6:30-9 p.m. Manhattan Penthouse (80 Fifth Avenue): New York Asian Women’s Center 29th Anniversary Benefit and Phoenix Awards; silent auction, hors d’oeuvres and cocktails; tickets can be purchased online at www.nycharities.org, keyword: New York Asian Women’s Center; call 646-502-5337 or visit www.nyawc.org for more information.

Through October 30 Queens Theatre in the Park: Chix 6; The pre-Broadway tryout of an exciting original musical by indie rock sensation and Queens native Lourds Lane; the story of a comic book artist whose superheroine characters leap off the page to teach her how to love herself; call 718-760-0064 or visit www.queenstheatre.org for ticket information.

Through November 12 Voelker Orth Museum: The Allure of Red; an eclectic mix of photographs taken by Greta M. Jaklitsch over a number of years; all photos are limited editions taken with 35mm film, not enhanced or altered; call 718-359-6227 or visit www.vomuseum.org.