Tag Archives: art

MoMA PS1 to offer free admission for NYC residents for one year

| amatua@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Elk Studios

The beloved art institution in Long Island City dedicated to exposing people to contemporary art will offer New York City residents free entry to all of its exhibitions beginning Oct. 11.

MoMA PS1 is able to provide free admission through a grant by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Keller Foundation, which provided the grant in honor of New York City artists, the museum said.

Residents living in any of the five boroughs can present proof of residency such as a driver’s license, state-issued identification card or a utility bill. The deal excludes concerts, performances, fundraisers and ticketed events held at MoMA PS1. Though the admission is relatively cheap — a suggested $10 donation — the grant was donated to expand the institution’s audience, according to Marina Kellen French, vice president of the Anna-Maria and Stephen Keller Foundation.

“It is important to give back to New York City, a city with so many artists. MoMA PS1 in Queens has many exhibitions that should be seen by everybody from all five boroughs,” French said. “I hope the gift will help [MoMA PS1’s] efforts to lower the barriers to enter the museum and reach out to an even wider audience.”

MoMA PS1 was opened in 1976 by Alanna Heiss, who has founded several nonprofit art organizations, as a welcoming space for New York City artists. Previously an abandoned public school, Heiss invited many artists to experiment with different forms of art including video, installation and performance art.

The organization has been affiliated with  MoMA since 2000 and is known for exhibits like the Young Architects Program, a competition that gives emerging architects a chance to build projects to be housed at the space, and the Warm Up Series, an outdoor music festival showcasing experimental live music and local and international DJs.

“MoMA PS1 sees itself as a citizen of all five boroughs with a proud base in Queens,” said Klaus Biesenbach, MoMA PS1 director and MoMA chief curator at large. “This gift is made in honor of all New York City artists as it also marks the occasion of MoMA PS1’s 40th anniversary in 2016.”

Art lovers looking to attend the museum on the first day of this promotion will experience the opening day of the Greater New York exhibition, which will showcase work from 157 artists and collectives living and working in New York City.


Art, film and music festival Kunstfest is coming to Ridgewood

| editorial@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photo courtesy of Troma Entertainment


World-renowned independent film studio Troma is coming to Ridgewood with the debut of Kunstfest, a celebration of B movies, beer and art, at local heavy metal hofbrau Bierleichen (582 Seneca Ave.) on Sunday, Sept. 6, from 4 to 10 p.m.

Troma Entertainment Inc. recently celebrated its 40th anniversary, making it the longest-running independent movie studio in North America. Troma studios first gained notoriety in the 1980s with the debut of their cult classic sci-fi comedy “The Toxic Avenger,” followed by other underground hits such as “Poultrygeist: Night of the Chicken Dead” and “Return to Nuke ‘Em High: Vol. 1.”

The upcoming Kunstfest will feature a screening of Troma’s latest Blu-ray release, “Extreme Jukebox.” The Italian horror comedy follows the misadventures of rock ‘n’ roll couple Jessie and Chloe after the young lovers unleash the murderous spirit of the Killer in the Woods, once contained in an LP found in the derelict estate of fictitious rock star David Crystal. Troma describes the film as “’Lords of Salem’ by way of ‘Rock ‘n’ Roll High School,’ with a side of spaghetti!”

Sunday’s festival kicks off with German food and beer specials from heavy metal German bar Bierleichen, along with a barbecue in the beer hall’s garden. “Extreme Jukebox” premiers at 5 p.m., followed by a special reading of Troma Entertainment president Lloyd Kaufman’s sci-fi satire novel “Pests” by Ridgewood resident and Troma studios’ own Jordan Young at 6:30 p.m.

Glendale-based Finback Brewery will be on hand to celebrate the release of Oscillation, its first-ever IPA in a can. Finback will be joined by Craft Beer New York, a mobile beer application, to celebrate Bierleichen’s addition to the app.

At 7 p.m., New York City-based indie rock trio The Shook Ones will take the stage for a live musical performance. The all-female band’s unique sound is an eclectic mix of 1960s girl groups, 1990s riot-girl punk, surf rock and funk. The band made its debut performance at 5Pointz in Queens and The Branded Saloon in Brooklyn during the 2013 Make Music New York Festival.

Kunstfest is derived from “Kunst,” which is German for art. To celebrate the festival’s mix of metal, art and German culture, Ridgewood Social will curate a small market of artists working in the horror and gore genres.

Admission to Kunstfest is free and open to the public. Festivalgoers will also be treated to a special secret surprise guest appearance at 8:30 p.m.

For more information, visit Bierleichen on Facebook.


Queens Council on the Arts inaugurates junior board of trustees

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Nicole E. Reiner/QCA

The Queens Council on the Arts (QCA), located in Astoria, has inaugurated a junior board of trustees.

According to QCA Development Coordinator Nicole E. Reiner, the junior board is comprised of 10 young professionals passionate about making an impact in their communities and bringing new perspectives to the boardroom table.

In accordance with its mission statement, the QCA, founded in 1966, has spent the past 50 years working “to foster and develop the arts in Queens County and to support individual artists and arts organizations in presenting their cultural diversity.” The junior board, with its diverse cultural makeup and professional experience in fields ranging from education to municipal administration to entrepreneurship, will come together with the goal of working with QCA staff to strengthen the nonprofit’s work as an arts services organization.

Four members of the junior board — Argentina Flores, Monica Sarmiento Castillo, Morgan Jones and Omar Solis — have already undertaken a project to advance toward this goal. Along with QCA staff, they have begun pooling their language and media skills to create a web series of multilingual informational videos designed to provide career-building skills to artists and art organizations.

In addition, the junior board organized a guided tour of Kaufman Astoria Studios, as well as a meet-and-greet with Principal Donna Finn of the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts, which included a student dance concert.

“Hearing Donna speak with pride about her accomplished students and teachers and their vision for the school’s further development was a spine-tingling highlight,” Reiner said.

QCA’s junior trustees, who are mostly in their 30s, will benefit from working with the more experienced senior board of directors, who will mentor the junior board and help them develop fundraising knowledge, make professional contacts and build their resumes. This mentorship will prepare the junior board to eventually succeed the current board of directors.

The following are the 10 members of the junior board of trustees:

Aryana Anderson – associate producer, Amplify Inc.
Monica Sarmiento Castillo – assistant director, Spanish graduate program, St. John’s University
Eileen Diskin – alumni relations director, Rudolf Steiner School
Claudia Filomena – NYC regional lead, NY Rising Communities Reconstruction Program, NYS Governor’s Office of Storm Recovery
Argentina Flores – founder, QNS Collective
Morgan Jones – senior advisor of outreach, Office of the Mayor
Alexandru Lucaci – personal banker, Investors Bank
Emily Schwartz – public programs manager, King Manor Museum
Emily Rios – blogger, We Heart Astoria
Omar Solis – founder, Digital Villain


Bartlett Contemporaries celebrates their 50th anniversary with ‘A Weekend to Remember’

| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Anthony Giudice

From forming their band at Andrew Jackson High School in 1964, to being the first band to play at the New York State Pavilion during the World’s Fair that same year, to performing at Spike Lee’s wedding reception, brothers Carl Bartlett Sr. and Charles Bartlett Jr. have done it all in the music scene.

This September, they invite the public to join them for their band’s 50th anniversary weekend celebration in Jamaica.

Bartlett Contemporaries with the Next Generation Sound, presented by the Bartlett Foundation Inc., will be hosting “A Weekend to Remember” from Friday, Sept. 11, to Sunday, Sept. 13, to celebrate the band’s many accomplishments during their half-century of performing.

The Bartlett brothers had a lot of early success, opening for Latin performers Eddie Palmieri and Tito Puente.

“They used to call us Bartlette Contemporaries [with an E] to give us a little Latin flair,” Charles Bartlett said. “The reason why we got into Latin and jazz, and ultimately R&B…it enabled us to reach wide audiences.”

Some of the key performances by Bartlett Contemporaries over the years include performing for Oprah Winfrey’s book party in Miami, performing at Miles Davis’ 60th birthday bash, performing for six Essence Awards parties, and many more.

“For Spike Lee, that was his wedding reception, so that made it personal,” Carl Bartlett said. “It was a great experience for my brother and I as co-leaders of the band and the band members. On that same par, playing for Oprah was great because we knew that when we got this call to do a very important engagement in Miami, we knew that was big because they said, ‘Give us a wish list of whatever equipment you need down there.’”

The Bartletts’ popularity, technical skill and work as educators has won them several prestigious awards including the New York State Proclamation for Living Music Legends in Queens, the NAACP Community Involvement Award, a citation from Nassau County Executive Tom Suozzi for service to Hofstra University, among several others.

The anniversary celebration kicks off on Sept. 11 for a meet and greet with the Bartletts at Proper Café in Jamaica.

On Sept. 12 the band will host their 50th anniversary concert at the Milton G. Bassin Performing Arts Center at York College. The black tie event runs from 5 to 8 p.m. where the band will perform “From Bebop to Hip-Hop,” featuring the music of Frank Sinatra to Justin Timberlake, from Madonna to Lady Gaga, from Earth Wind & Fire to Pharrell, and more. An after party will be held from 8 to 10 p.m.

“So many people consider them a dance band…so we built in the after party, which will be right there at the concert, and all of the ticket prices will include the after party,” said Philippa L. Karteron, president and CEO of Galleria Noire, and event planner for the anniversary performance.

Honorary hosts of the celebration include Congressman Gregory Meeks; state Senators Leroy Comrie and James Sanders Jr.; Assemblywomen Vivian Cook, Barbara Clark and Michele Titus; and Councilmen I. Daneek Miller, Donovan Richards and Ruben Wills.

On Sept. 13, the Bartlett brothers will hold a jazz brunch at the Jamaica Performing Arts Center.

“That particular function is the type of function that will give the people the chance to …network,” Charles Bartlett said. “Businesspeople will get a chance and sit down and we’ll break bread together and we can connect and network. That is a very powerful brunch that will take place on Sunday. It’s the opportunity to mix a little business with a lot of pleasure.”


Fresh Pond Road street festival to hold student poetry and art contest

| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photo courtesy Angelica Harris

Organizers of the Fresh Pond Road street festival in Ridgewood will present something new at this September’s fair: a poetry and art contest open to local schoolchildren.

The participants for this poetry and art contest, hosted by the Federazione Italo-Americana di Brooklyn and Queens, must be enrolled in a New York City public or private grammar, intermediate or high school. They are to present one original poem and one original artwork.

“This contest is going to add a new dimension to the festival and the people who visit Ridgewood,” said Michael Conigliaro, managing director-adviser of the festival for the Federazione Italo-Americana di Brooklyn and Queens.

The topic for the contest is “Growing up ______American in Queens,” (i.e. Growing up Italian-American in Queens), with an alternate topic of “What community means to you.”

Students from any country or ethnic background can submit a poem and piece of art about their experiences and their families’ experiences living in Queens.

“As a professional writer, poet and advocate for children, to be able to read and share the poems of these youngsters from Queens, will be a treasure to our great borough, and to bring together everyone, no matter what their background,” said Angelica Harris, president of the Excalibur Reading Program located in Glendale, and poetry contest leader.

Each participant is allowed to submit one poem and one piece of art. The contest will be divided into three categories, one for grammar school, one for intermediate school and one for high school. Poems are to be in English, five verses, up to five stanzas long, but no more than 50 verses on one sheet.

The art pieces must be a drawing or painting in oil, watercolor or any other creative medium and must not be larger than 2 feet by 2 feet.

The works of the participants will be on display during the four-day festival in a special community stand.

“We want to offer a free space to nonprofits in order to be able to allow them a chance to show what their organization offers, and to help our neighbors find resources that they may need for their families,” said Lucy Dolce, office director of the Federazione Italo-Americana di Brooklyn and Queens, and festival coordinator.

The contest will be judged by professional teachers, poets and artists. Three prizes will be given out, one for each category. Prizes will be handed out during a special ceremony to be held on Sept. 6, the final day of the four-day festival. Prizes adding up to $1,200 will be divided between the winners.

If students or parent have any questions or want submit their poetry and piece of art, they can send it to Harris’ email at info@excaliburreadingprogram.org. The deadline for all submissions is Aug. 15.


PHOTOS: Hundreds of local artists participate in Bushwick Open Studios

| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photos by Anthony Giudice

Over 600 art studios across Ridgewood and Bushwick opened their doors for Arts in Bushwick’s ninth annual Bushwick Open Studios (BOS) weekend, from June 5 through June 7.

BOS is the largest open studios event in New York City. The three-day arts and culture festival brings together visual artists, performers, musicians and designers to share their work with the public through studio visits, group shows and creative events.

Many forms of art, including paintings, sculptures, creative furniture, spray paint murals and much more were on display throughout the studios and streets of Bushwick and Ridgewood over the weekend.

Jeff Fichera is a veteran of the BOS scene, this year being his fifth open studios event, but he still finds the event to be exciting.

“It’s both invigorating and exhausting to share my work with so many people over a few days,” Fichera said. “It’s incredible to get so much valuable feedback from all of the visitors, but it’s also a very unusual situation to have so many people in the studio. The studio is almost always a place of quiet solitude and so the frantic activity is exhausting.”

“I think BOS is one of the best parts about the Bushwick/Ridgewood artist scene,” Fichera continued. “It really defines the boundaries of our community and allows everyone to participate and be seen and focuses the attention of the art world on what is happening here. It brings an enormous amount of attention and cohesion to the community.”

While some artists focused on showcasing their art, others, like Rodney Allen Trice, were interested in reaching out to collectors for their work. Trice is an artist and designer who creates new pieces of furniture from found objects.

“I have been doing this over 20 years,” Trice said. “I’m always inspired by objects I fall in love with and want to make useful again. To get an opportunity for this many people to see [my work] is a chance to find those unique buyers and collectors who find the same love as you do for the things I find and build with.”

Other artists participated in group showings, such as those involved with the Ridgewood Artists Coalition who put their art up at the “Ridgewood Represent!” event at the Onderdonk House in Ridgewood.

“It feels great to have my art on display here with everyone else’s for the Bushwick Open Studios,” said Alison Duignan, who was participating in her first art show. “I’m glad it’s less formal because I’ve never showed my work before, so I don’t feel out of place.”

Danielle Draik, co-curator of the “Ridgewood Represent!” art show has had her work appear in several other art shows, but this is her first time at BOS.

“Being a part of BOS is great,” Draik said. “Having an art show at a historic location in the festival and representing the adjacent town is very important. The Onderdonk House, an active arts staple in the neighborhood, really represents Ridgewood Arts Culture and it means a lot that they would have us local artists here.”


Queens students fight against animal abuse and endangerment through art

| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photos by Anthony Giudice

Middle school students from across the city are getting the chance to have their artwork put on display in city parks thanks to Learning through an Expanded Arts Program’s (LeAp) public art program.

Students from P.S. 9 Walter Reed School in Queens participated in the public art program where they expressed their thoughts on the issues of animal abuse and animal endangerment through the power of art.

The project, titled “A View from the Lunchroom Students Bringing Issues to the Table,” tasked students with painting a lunchroom table to help raise awareness for their topic of choice.

“A lot of animals are being killed for their tusks or to make food,” said Demitirius Morris, student of P.S. 9 at I.S. 5. “It was fun making the table. We want to tell people to be nice to animals and protect the Earth. It is most important to me because I have a dog.”

Their table is now on display at Juniper Valley Park in Middle Village and will remain there through August.

“We are proud to put our table in Juniper Valley Park in Queens, New York,” said Vincent Suraty, a student at Walter Reed School.

The public art program allows public school students to have a voice in their communities and speak out on the social issues that matter to them. The children work with a LeAp teaching artist to explore the critical issues in their communities, study the history of the issues raised and learn how to express themselves through art.

“The idea is to target this age group to show them that adults respect what they have to say,” said Alexandra Leff, director of LeAp’s public art program. “We give them this public forum to express themselves and empower them to have a voice through artwork.”

The students learned from the LeAp teaching artist how to use art as a form of expression, and how their message can reach many people.

“We teach the students about symbolism in art, how to use color and to visually express their message,” said Christy Powers, LeAp teaching artist. “We teach them how important that is, especially in Queens, with such a diverse population and people speaking different languages. Art has a way to emotionally impact you.”

Walter Reed School was just one of 10 schools from all five boroughs to have their artwork displayed in city parks. This art program is the largest student art exhibition in the history of New York City parks, and the first to span the five boroughs.


Queens students look at the horrors of genocide

| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photo by Anthony Giudice

They vowed to never forget — and never again allow another Holocaust.

Students, faculty members and survivors of the genocide gathered at the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center and Archives (KHRCA) of Queensborough Community College (QCC) for the opening night of “Testimony Across the Disciplines: Queensborough Community College Students Respond to Genocide through Art and Writing.”

Over 300 students and 20 faculty members from five colleges, working in 10 academic disciplines, were involved with creating this capstone exhibit, presented by the 2014-2015 National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Challenge Grant Colloquia.

“Testimony Across the Disciplines” features a wide variety of works by students who conducted research and studied cultural and artistic responses to genocide and organized hate. For one year, the students worked closely with faculty members, Holocaust survivors, victims and offenders of incarceration, and genocide scholars to create the exhibit.

“I wanted to immerse students across several disciplines in the study of genocide and then capture their creative responses,” said Cary Lane, from QCC’s department of academic literacy and co-project investigator. “Tonight, the students’ creative responses are on display as both an art exhibit and performance of music, dance and poetry.”

“Profiles of Survival: Holocaust Survivors of the KHRCA,” was a collaborative effort between academic literacy ESL students and art and design photography students to document, both visually and verbally, the experiences of the KHRCA Holocaust survivors.

The students who wrote the biographies conducted group and personal interviews with the survivors to learn about their stories. One of those survivors, Elena Berkovits, lectured the students on her experiences during the Holocaust for the project.

According to her profile, written by student Haeun Kim, Berkovits was born in Transylvania in 1928, and by 1944 the Nazis took control of her country. She and her family, along with hundreds of other Jews, were transported to the Auschwitz concentration camp. She remembered the Nazis sending the children, the elderly and the infirmed directly to the gas chambers.

“When I lived in Transylvania, it belonged to Hungary,” Berkovits explained to visitors at the event. “I was taken to Auschwitz. It was just horrible.”

Berkovits survived the ordeal and, in 1945, married her husband and had a daughter. She now has two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Another pieces focused on the Holocaust, “Graphic Narratives and Objects Reflections,” consists of stories that combine visual and textual elements to form a unique reading experience. Students were tasked with creating their own graphic narratives exploring the themes of genocide, war, identity and ethnicity.

The “Poetry: Resisting Silence, Giving Voice” exhibit gave students the opportunity to express their feelings toward genocide, racism, war, trauma and oppression, through poetry.

On a much more current topic, the exhibit “Restorative Justice and Community Healing” focuses on healing not only the victim, but also the offender and the community, of the damage caused by violent crimes.

“Restorative justice looks at the goal of repairing the harm that was caused by crime in non-traditional ways,” said Rose Marie Äikäs, Ph.D., assistant professor of criminal justice. “We wanted to teach through process.”

Äikäs’ students visited Hour Children in Astoria, an organization dedicated to helping incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women and their children rebuild relationships with their families, rejoin the community and create healthy lives.

The series of interviews conducted by the students were documented and displayed as part of the exhibit.

“Testimony Across the Disciplines,” is open from April 16 to May 21 at the KHRCA.


First Ridgewood Artists Coalition exhibit opens Sunday at Glendale brewery

| editorial@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photo by Kelly Marie Mancuso


The Ridgewood Artists Coalition (RAC) will hold its first exhibit, titled “The Ridgewood Artists Spring Showcase,” at Glendale’s Finback Brewery from this Sunday through April 26.

The opening reception for the exhibit will be held on Sunday from 1 to 7 p.m. at the brewery, located at 78-01 77th Ave. Donations collected at the reception will help support the Ridgewood Youth Market, a program that teaches teens and young adults small business lessons through operating farm stands in their neighborhoods.

The Ridgewood Youth Market is part of Grow NYC and is run in partnership with the Myrtle Avenue Business Improvement District and the Ridgewood Local Development Corporation.

The exhibit, described by its creators as “part survey and part dialogue,” is co-curated by RAC founder Emily Heinz and Finback manager Leah Blair and features local artists who live and work in Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village and Glendale.

“The artists involved emerge from a myriad of different backgrounds, spanning the spectrum of age, ethnicity, formal training and relationship to the area,” Heinz and Blair said in a joint statement. “This diversity is intrinsic to a New York neighborhood, and the spirit of this condition is reflected in the variation of the works, which simultaneously form a single yet multifarious voice informed by the specific perspective of a cross-section of urban life.”

The showcase is just one of many community-oriented events hosted and sponsored by Finback Brewery.

“This collaboration between the Ridgewood Artists Coalition and Finback Brewery is indicative of an emerging art practice that is inclined towards social awareness and local identity, and uses both to organically form a presence of contemporary art and artists who are critically engaged with art making and socially engaged with the community as a whole,” the statement said.

For more information about the Ridgewood Artists Coalition, contact them at RidgewoodArtists@gmail.com.


RoGallery: A leader in art auctions

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of RoGallery


Most people think of art as beautiful paintings, sculpture and photography. There is a second art in the visual arts, and that is money. Occasionally the price of a classic painting at Christie’s or Sotheby’s is $30 million or more. The art world has a new extension to desirable art with photography and sculpture that are sold for increasingly staggering prices.

In Long Island City, RoGallery, an auction house founded more than 30 years ago by Robert Rogal, now the director of business and operations, occupies a 10,000-square-foot building that holds the gallery’s collection of modern and contemporary art including paintings, print, photographs and sculpture.

Rogal is a native New Yorker and has found that Long Island City is an ideal place for his business, highly attractive to its clients on the East Side and Manhattan itself. Rogal has always been involved with the world of art. Before opening the gallery, he was involved in a number of businesses backed by his expertise in corporate financial activity. Art was always an area of interest for him. Before opening the gallery he was very active in the world of franchising, with major clients including Alice’s Restaurants.

“I first became interested in art at college,” Rogal said. “I learned much about it and enjoyed what I learned. I’d become interested in adding my own business experience to the buying and selling of art and created the Ro Gallery.”

He established the gallery as a highly successful business that is greatly admired by clients and other members of the art community.

New items are brought into the gallery every day, and Robert attends estate sales and private and corporate collections. This is enormously important in order to attract the best possible work for sale privately, corporately and as prints.

Some of the names included in the gallery include Braque, Dali, Koons, Lichtenstein, Matisse, Newman, Picasso, Rivers and Wendell.

Although it is not unknown for Robert to sell paintings for six figures, a look at recent auction catalogues shows a wide spectrum of choice and price. Recent pieces include a print by Robert Rauschenberg, a Warhol for $4,500 and two David Hockney prints using a ‘60s-style photocopying technique for $60-80,000.

“Taking the position in the art auction world does mean constantly searching sources of the finest work that could be available for our clients,” he said.

The gallery has been in the forefront when it comes to e-commerce on its RoGallery.com website.

“The continued expansion of this kind of buying is something we have embraced and developed from the very beginning,” Rogal said. “It is a growing attraction to buyers because they can look in detail at reproductions of the work that they are interested in, purchase as soon as they have decided and hopefully not be beaten by another buyer.”

“I believe that this is about the future, and we will expand further and further,” Rogal said. “The thing that excites me most is the hunt.”

The diversity of the art auction market is enormous. The gallery’s publishing of lithographs, posters and prints increase the range of sales opportunities and the gallery’s revenue base.

“The art market has become more competitive each year, clients have become more knowledgeable, forgeries of original works have continued and the value of artwork [is] increasing,” he said.

Whatever changes there are in buying, auctions and collection sales, Long Island City’s major addition to the world of art will continue to develop and provide the finest work that Rogal’s research will find.


Box art show guaranteed to surprise buyers

| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Flushing Town Hall

Artists from around the world gathered in Flushing Town Hall on Monday to wrap their art in boxes as part of an art exhibition called “Boxes: Lost in Circulation.”

On Friday, people visiting the art exhibition will open about 50 boxes that hold the artwork of 14 artists. Patrons will pay $50 per box — without seeing the art or knowing who created it.

The curator, Hyunsuk Kim, is hoping to blur the lines between famous and obscure artists by putting everyone’s work in indistinguishable boxes.

“An artist and a work of an artist are constrainedly positioned in the capitalistic system. An artwork is often being treated as worthless if it is a work of an unknown artist,” Kim said. “If your name is not a brand, your works are not born yet although they are made.”

Kim hopes that the exhibition will help “diminish inequalities among artists and to let people focus on artworks.”


Fifth annual music, art street festival coming to Sunnyside

| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Sunnyside Shines

The streets of Sunnyside will be alive with the sound of music and art this summer.

The Sunnyside Shines Business Improvement District will present its fifth annual free street festival called Sunnyside Summer Strolls on Saturday, July 26 and August 2.

Sunnyside Summer Strolls will bring together local businesses, residents and local organizations under the Sunnyside arch at 46th Street, which has been transformed into a temporary public space with tables and chairs, and scheduled activities.

“Sunnyside Summer Strolls is a great community event series, designed to promote our local businesses, bring arts programming to the neighborhood and provide a temporary public space for the day,” said Rachel Thieme, executive director of Sunnyside Shines. “We are excited to partner with Re-Create QNS to bring new energy and arts expertise to the event this year.”

On Saturday, July 26 is the Children’s Arts and Crafts Fair from 1 to 6 p.m., produced in partnership with Re-Create QNS, a new coalition of creative Sunnyside organizations. Activities include face painting, water marbling, ballet, Irish step, modern dance and performances by local musicians. Families will also have the opportunity to meet with artists and teachers of neighborhood arts and enrichment programs.

Photo by Michael Rapp

“Sunnyside is home to so many innovative and passionate arts groups,” said Nancy Kleaver, Re-Create Qns director. “Re-Create QNS wants to spread the word and make more connections between the public and our local cultural institutions. It will be a fun day for kids and families to be creative together.”

Under the elevated No. 7 train, the new Bliss Plaza will host a pop-up library in partnership with the Uni Project, the Sunnyside branch of the Queens Public Library and the Neighborhood Plaza Partnership.

The following Saturday,  from 2 to 7 p.m., will be the Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Concert featuring a 1920s theme and lineup of jazz musicians and performers including The Sunnyside Wolverines featuring Linda Ipanema, The Sunnyside Social Club, The Pendulum Swings, The Sunnyside Drum Corps, and The Big Apple Lindy Hoppers.

There will also be a dance floor set up in the street, free photo booth and a 1920s costume contest. Local businesses will be on-site offering free giveaways and services.

For more information visit www.sunnysideshines.org.



Apollonia NYC Gallery set to open in Sunnyside

| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

Sunnyside will soon be home to a new antique shop, also serving as a gallery and cultural event space, looking to showcase emerging, established and local artists.

The Apollonia NYC Gallery, located at 48-14 Skillman Ave. and named after owner Garry O’Calloghan’s late dog, will hold its grand opening on July 20 starting at 4 p.m.

The site is expected to feature handmade and distressed furnishings, lighting, paintings, prints, photos, record collections, antique cameras and other home décor items.

Along with being an antique shop, Apollonia NYC Gallery is expected to also host “salon-like” gatherings for musicians, poetry readings and artist talks through the year.

“I wanted to create a mythological and magical place like the shop in the Gremlins that gives guests the feeling of being in a secret place where they can find one-of-a-kind treasures,” said O’Calloghan, who is also an artist. “This is also a wonderful way to meet interesting people and celebrate the vibrant local arts scene.”

In June, the space held its first preview event for the unofficial afterparty for the annual The Queen of Angels Art Fair, organized by Sunnyside artists.

Apollonia’s grand opening, which according to organizers coincides with the ancient feast day honoring the Greek god Apollo, will feature music by Le Petit Pepinot and The Sunnyside Social Club. Guests are welcome to dress in their favorite vintage clothing.

The opening will also include samples from Murphy’s Lobster Grill, meet-and-greets with Apollonia’s owners, and international and local artists, and the debut of a new mural on the space’s ceiling.

Apollonia NYC Gallery will be opened Tuesday through Friday from 3 to 8 p.m., and weekends from 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.

For more information visit www.facebook.com/ApolloniaGallery.



Glendale business aims to showcase local artists

| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

The arts are coming to Glendale.

Angelica Harris runs the Excalibur Reading Program on 78th Avenue, and she hopes to transform the center into an art venue once a week.

“We don’t have a program or venue that showcases Glendale artists,” Harris said. “It’s my dream to bring the arts to Glendale.”

Harris plans on booking musicians and poets every Friday evening to showcase their work to an audience of about 30 people. The July 18 event kicks off a new feature that Harris hopes will become a staple every week.

“I want to expose artists and educate people about the need for art in the community,” said Harris, who has run the learning and tutoring programs on 78th Avenue for two years.

Bill McClure, a landscape painter and window designer, has lived in Glendale for a year and said that the creation of an art night is welcome news.

“It’s wonderful because we need places for artists to communicate and there’s nothing in the Glendale area,” he said.

Since moving to Glendale, McClure has had to leave the neighborhood to showcase his work.

But with the new venue, McClure, 52, plans to exhibit his work locally.

Harris, who has lived in Glendale for 20 years, is asking people who want to watch the music and poetry show to make a $10 donation.

Harris has a personal devotion to the arts, having written several books, including “Living With Rage,” which recounts the domestic violence she experienced.

“The arts were my salvation, my sanity,” she said. “That’s why I have this dream of the art program. I want people to talk about what art helps them with.”



Looking into the artwork of LIC artist Luba Lukova

| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Aeroblue © Luba Lukova

What was only supposed to be a one-week visit to New York for an international exhibition has turned into about 25 years of success for Long Island City artist Luba Lukova.

As a young girl in Bulgaria, Lukova never had a doubt as to what she wanted to be when she grew up. Influenced by her grandmother who was an artist, Lukova began to attend art classes and then graduated from an art academy.

Through an invite from Colorado State University, where school officials had seen some of her early artwork, Lukova came to New York for an organized exhibition featuring artists from all over the world.

Her initial idea was to stay in New York for a week and then return to Bulgaria, but she decided to stay indefinitely, and in 1991, she began drawing illustrations for the book review section of The New York Times. She then moved on and drew for the publication’s Op-Ed section covering subjects such as the Middle East.

These illustrations opened up doors for Lukova, exposing her to a larger audience, which got her into theatre work creating posters, and years later she even got a call from then-presidential candidate Barack Obama’s campaign to use one of her images months before his inauguration.

“It was just a miracle. I never went back [to Bulgaria],” she said. “For a young artist, it was a mind-blowing experience and when I saw the reaction of the people, it was really very exciting for me.”

Lukova’s pieces, whether they are on a canvas or theatre poster, all convey social and political issues in what she calls a “simple and accessible way.” She tells a whole story with just a few colors and images and creates visual metaphors for viewers to take in.

“[My artwork] involves thinking and the viewer’s participation,” she said. “All of my work is like that — it’s always provoking stuff. I try to make it accessible and bring something to the contemporary viewer that can stop them and make them think.”

Her “Social Justice” poster portfolio, the first publication from her own publishing company, has gotten her national and international acclaim. Currently some of her work is part of a show at the Museum of Modern Art and Denver Art Museum.

After moving out of Manhattan following 9/11, Lukova has been working and living in the booming art scene found in Long Island City. Last year she took part in the LIC Arts Open festival, which introduced her to a community she has now become a part of and loves.

“I think it’s a great group of artists with a lot of energy,” she said. “The art community here is growing and it is so huge.”

This year Lukova designed the poster for the LIC Arts Open, and her exhibition “Drama on Paper: Posters for the Stage” can be found at The Local at 13-02 44th Ave. throughout the festival.

     LIC ARTS OPEN POSTER © Luba Lukova

“I’m excited to be a part of it again,” Lukova said. “I think what [the festival organizers] do is very admirable and I hope we will keep the community here and we will expand. Because New York without the arts would be a very sad picture. We don’t just want New York to be the city with museums; we need the real art here.”