Tag Archives: Alley Pond Park

Elmhurst woman writes Queens walking tour book


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Image courtesy of Adrienne Onofri

One Elmhurst woman is hoping her new book will help readers step out their doors and take a stroll while exploring all that Queens has to offer.

Adrienne Onofri is the author behind “Walking Queens,” a new book that features 30 detailed walking tours through the borough exploring architecture, distinct cultures in different neighborhoods, historical landmarks, celebrity homes and natural scenery.

“There are one or two books about neighborhoods in Queens but really no guide book completely dedicated to Queens,” Onofri said. 

The opportunity to write this book came after Onofri, a licensed New York City sightseeing guide, wrote “Walking Brooklyn: 30 Tours Exploring Historical Legacies.” 

Her publisher became interested in doing a version for Queens, and Onofri said she jumped at the idea because a lot of people had asked her to write a walking tour book for the borough she has called home for decades.

“I liked the idea because I can say I live in Queens,” Onofri said. 

To compile the book, which took about a year to finish, Onofri traveled the borough on nothing but her two legs and public transportation. She sketched out routes based on what she already had in mind or knew she wanted to include. Other locations, she said, she roamed and discovered in order to create the detailed walks. 

“There are a lot of people that drive around and don’t get around in public transportation much,” Onofri said. “[The book] is just encouraging them to go a few neighborhoods over, which they would normally drive pass on the highway.”

The neighborhoods featured in the book go from Long Island City and Astoria all the way to Howard Beach and the Rockaways. Along with these, Onofri also spent time in the borough’s parks such as Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Alley Pond Park and Rockaway Park. 

The book, with photographs taken by the author, includes maps of the area that will be walked, nearby trains or buses, points of interest in the neighborhood, historical facts and detailed directions of how to get around. 

Part of the Hunters Point Historic District on 45th Ave. in Long Island City (Photo by  Adrienne Onofri)

Part of the Hunters Point Historic District on 45th Ave. in Long Island City (Photo by Adrienne Onofri)

“There are things you walk past and don’t notice,” Onofri said. “This book has the discoveries of things that you might not take the time to notice regularly.”

While working on the book, Onofri said she realized there were instances where she noticed things she hadn’t before. Also, one of the issues was trying to fit as much as she could in the 254-page book, with some things just not being able to be included. 

“There was a lot of stuff to learn, whether it was just some place I had been only a couple of times or a place I really didn’t know much about before,” she said. 

Onofri said she is still conducting tours in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. 

To contact Onofri to schedule a tour, email walkingqueens@gmail.com.

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Birds flock to winter hot spot Queens


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of the Queens County Bird Club

Queens isn’t just the world’s borough. It’s also the birds’ borough.

Birds migrating south for the winter stop in Queens, using the borough’s numerous parks as a rest stop. Other birds, like the snow owl, dig in for the winter and stay in New York City for the season. Witnessing it all are the bird watchers of the Queens County Bird Club.

Bird watching – or birding, to use the hobby’s parlance – is a common practice in Queens, according to Arie Gilbert, president of the Queens County Bird Club. As the season nears winter, leaves falling from trees give parks a desolate, dead look, but they reveal many types of birds that won’t be found in warmer months. Gilbert’s club makes many trips to Alley Pond Park, Kissena Park, Forest Park and, of course, Gilbert said, Jamaica Bay.

“For anybody who even has a passing knowledge of birding knows about Queens and Jamaica Bay,” Gilbert said. “People from all over the world come to New York City to go to Jamaica Bay.”

In these hot spots, people will be able to see birds like the Iceland gull, the great-horned owl and the wood duck.

Along with bird watching trips, the club plans on holding a lecture on Nov. 19 that will help bird watchers identify and note the subtle difference in subspecies like those found in sparrows.

“Birding is not like football. It doesn’t have the same appeal,” Gilbert said. “But it’s a lot of fun being outdoors.”

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Health Department to treat Queens against West Nile


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC Department of Health

On Friday, Aug. 15, Monday, Aug.18 and Tuesday, Aug.19, the Health Department will treat parts of Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of West Nile virus.

The treatment, which will apply larvicide by using a low-flying helicopter, will take place between the hours of 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Monday, Aug. 18, Tuesday, Aug.19 and Wednesday, Aug. 20 during the same hours

VectoBacTM CG, VectoMaxTM CG/FG and/or VectoLexTM CG/FG—all containing naturally occurring bacteria—will be used for this spraying. These larvicides are used throughout the mosquito season to treat mosquito- breeding sites, and are approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, according to the city’s Health Department.

LOCATIONS:

Alley Pond Park and Alley Creek (Boundaries: Marsh areas inside Alley Pond Park)

Linden Hill/ College Point and Abandoned Flushing Airport (Boundaries: Marsh areas bounded by Whitestone Expressway to the east; 20th Avenue to the north; 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west; and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south)

Edgemere, Somerville Dubos Point and Edgemere Park (Boundaries: Marsh areas bounded by Norton Basin to the east; Mott Point to the north; Grass Hassock Channel to the west; and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south)

 

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Health Department to treat areas of Queens against West Nile this week


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of James Gathany/CDC

On Wednesday, June 18, Thursday, June 19 and Friday, June 20 the Health Department will treat parts of Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of West Nile virus.

The treatment, which will apply larvicide by using a low-flying helicopter, will take place between the hours of 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Thursday, June 19, Friday, June 20 and Monday, June 23 during the same hours.

VectoBacTM CG, VectoMaxTM CG/FG and/or VectoLexTM CG/FG—all containing naturally occurring bacteria—will be used for this spraying. These larvicides are used throughout the mosquito season to treat mosquito- breeding sites, and are approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, according to the city’s Health Department.

LOCATIONS:

Alley Pond Park and Alley Creek (Boundaries: Marsh areas inside Alley Pond Park)

Linden Hill/ College Point and Abandoned Flushing Airport (Boundaries: Marsh areas bounded by Whitestone Expressway to the east; 20th Avenue to the north; 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west; and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south)

Edgemere, Somerville Dubos Point and Edgemere Park (Boundaries: Marsh areas bounded by Norton Basin to the east; Mott Point to the north; Grass Hassock Channel to the west; and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south)

 

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Little Neck restaurant Mizumi to expand, clean up eyesore


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Liam La Guerre

Follow me @liamlaguerre

 

Mizumi restaurant is pumping funds into a planned expansion that will clean up the eyesore next door, a defunct gas station, The Courier has learned.

Owners of the sushi restaurant and buffet bought the former Getty gas station on 231-06 Northern Blvd., which has been tagged with graffiti for more than a year, and plan to replace it with an extension of the eatery.

Besides cleaning off the vandalism, the Chiang family, which owns Mizumi, hired Advanced Cleanup Technologies to remediate any environmental concerns caused by the gas station or expansion as it sits directly in front of Alley Pond Park.

“As we all know, gas stations, or any automotive-related shops can negatively impact its neighborhood,” Ken Chiang said in an email. “We wanted to make sure that our environment and Alley Pond Park would not [be] affected by our expansion.”

Owners of the restaurant aren’t certain what to turn the expanded space into yet, but are contemplating adding extra seating capacity to accommodate large gatherings for catered private events. And the family hired the same Japanese interior and exterior designer who created Mizumi to articulate the style into the extension. After finalizing plans, they will present it to the Board of Standards and Appeals.

“I think everyone can agree that a restaurant or potentially a catering space is far more attractive for the community and storefront of Northern Boulevard than a gas station or auto repair center,” Chiang said.

 

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Op-ed: Seven-point plan


| oped@queenscourier.com

BOB FRIEDRICH AND EASTERN QUEENS UNITED

Last week, a convicted killer escaped from the state-run Creedmoor Psychiatric facility in Bellerose, where he was being held for observation.

This is a serious concern to the civic leaders of this community and other nearby community organizations.

Creedmoor is located in an area of single family homes and is very close to Glen Oaks Village, a co-op community of 10,000 residents. It is situated across the street from a children’s playground in Alley Pond Park, one of Queens’ largest parks.

The escape was also brazen for the ease in which it was accomplished. Exchanging clothes with a visiting friend was enough to allow a convicted killer to walk out undetected and into the neighborhood.

The stunning failure in security by the State Office of Mental Health has been a sore point with community leaders for many years.

The state has consistently failed to provide adequate funding to properly secure this large institution and as a result, numerous incidents have occurred which has put a strain on the already over-burdened local police precinct.

The time has come for real and serious action. Community leaders and local elected officials are calling for a full investigation and a security plan of action in which all stakeholders in the community must be involved.

Eastern Queens is a wonderful part of the city and is fortunate to have an active and vocal group of civic associations that seek to protect the quality of life of the communities they represent.

These civic associations represent thousands of folks that live along the tree-lined streets that surround Creedmoor. We are confident that elected officials, affected agencies and other community organizations will work together to resolve the security issues plaguing the Creedmoor Psychiatric Hospital.

Responding to this breach in security at Creedmoor, a coalition of more than a dozen civic presidents have issued a seven-point plan of action, which you can read below:

1. A full investigation of this incident.

2. Adoption of a comprehensive security plan for the entire Creedmoor campus that would prevent a recurrence of a similar incident in the future.

3. NYS Office of Mental Health must provide the resources to fund a proper level of security.

4. Disclosure and transparency as to the type of individuals being housed at Creedmoor.

5. A Community Notification Protocol to provide immediate alerts of dangerous situations.

6. A similar review and assessment of security at nearby Zucker-Hillside Hospital.

7. The inclusion of nearby civic associations and other stakeholders in the outreach and development of a security plan.

 

Jerry Wind, president of the Bellerose Hillside Civic Association

Bobby Sher, president of the Bell Park-Manor Terrace Co-op

Michael O’Keeffe, president of the Creedmoor Civic Association

Bob Friedrich, president of the Glen Oaks Village Co-op

Michael Castellano, president of the Lost Community Civic Association

Bruno DeFranceschi, president of the North Bellerose Civic Association

Judith Cohen, president of the North Hills Estates Civic Association

Richard Hellenbrecht, president of the Queens Civic Congress

Angela Augugliaro, president of the Queens Colony Civic Association

Jim Trent, president of the Queens County Farm Museum

Mo Ishmael, president of the Queens Village Civic Association

Frank Toner, president of the Rocky Hill Civic Association

Rhonda Kontner, president of the Royal Ranch Homeowners Association

 

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West Nile spraying in Queens this week


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of James Gathany/CDC

On Tuesday, July 9, Wednesday, July 10 and Thursday, July 11, there will be West Nile spraying in Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of the disease in the following marsh and other non-residential areas:

Alley Pond Park: Alley Creek Marsh (areas inside Alley Pond Park)

Linden Hill/College Point: Abandoned Flushing Airport (Marsh areas bounded by Whitestone Expressway to the east; 20th Avenue to the north; 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west; and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south)

Edgemere, Somerville: Dubos Point and Edgemere Park (Marsh areas bounded by Norton Basin to the east; Mott Point to the north; Grass Hassock Channel to the west; and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south)

The spraying will take place between the hours of 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Wednesday, July 10, Thursday July 11 and Friday, June 12 during the same hours.

VectoBac™ CG, VectoMax™ CG/FG and/or VectoLex™ CG/FG – all containing naturally occurring bacteria—will be used for this spraying. These larvicides are used throughout the mosquito season to treat mosquito breeding sites, and are approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New York  State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Photo courtesy of NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

West Nile spraying in Queens this week


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of James Gathany/CDC

On Wednesday June, 12 and Thursday, June 13 there will be West Nile spraying in Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of the disease in the following areas:

Alley Pond Park: Alley Creek Marsh (areas inside Alley Pond Park)

Linden Hill/College Point: Abandoned Flushing Airport (Marsh areas bounded by Whitestone Expressway to the east; 20th Avenue to the north; 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west; and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south)

Edgemere, Somerville: Dubos Point and Edgemere Park (Marsh areas bounded by Norton Basin to the east; Mott Point to the north; Grass Hassock Channel to the west; and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south)

The spraying will take place between the hours of 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Thursday, June 13 and Friday, June 14 during the same hours.

West Nile virus has not yet been detected anywhere in New York City this season, according to the Health Department.

VectoBac™ CG, VectoMax™ CG/FG and/or VectoLex™ CG/FG – all containing naturally occurring bacteria—will be used for this spraying. These larvicides are used throughout the mosquito season to treat mosquito breeding sites, and are approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New York  State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Photo courtesy of NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

More West Nile spraying in Queens this week


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Courtesy of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

For the fifth time this summer, the city will be spraying for West Nile virus in Queens this week.

The Department Health and Mental Hygiene announced they will spray larvicide in three Queens neighborhoods beginning today.

There has been one confirmed case of West Nile in the city this year — a Staten Island man — after 11 were diagnosed with the virus a year ago.

More than 40 pools of standing water have tested positive for the virus in Queens.

The Health Department has already begun spraying parts of Alley Pond Park, College Point and Edgemere. The application of the larvicide will last until 7 p.m. tonight. Larvicide will be applied to the areas again between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday.

The targeted spots are the marsh areas inside Alley Pond Park, the abandoned Flushing airport bounded by the Whitestone Expressway to the east, 20th Avenue to the north, 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south and Edgemere Park bounded by Norton Basin to the east, Mott Point to the north, Grass Hassock Channel to the west and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south.

The pesticide being used, Anvil 10 + 10, poses no health risks when used properly, but the Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

• Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.

• Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.

• Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using again.

• Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

Free summer activities in Queens parks


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

In addition to outdoor movies and SummerStage performing arts events, the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation offers other free activities in Queens parks this summer.

July 30

Fort Totten Park

Fit Walk (Step Out)
9:00 a.m.
“Join us for a free fitness walking program for adults at Fort Totten Park!”

Mommy, Music, & Me
10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
“Enjoy music and movement activities for children under 7 years old, and the adults that want to play with them. We will also do a musical craft project with the kids.”

August 1

Alley Pond Park

A Morning of Music with Darlene Graham
10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
“This interactive and exciting performance features energetic folk music and remixes of familiar children’s songs that will have everyone singing and dancing along.”

Highland Park

Latin Night featuring Mikata
7:00 p.m.
“Join us for an evening of Bachata and Merengue featuring Mikata.”

August 2

Forest Park

Swing Sabroso
7:30 p.m.
“Dance along to the rhythmic sounds of Salsa.”

Astoria Park Lawn

Waterfront Concert Series 2012
7:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

August 3

Flushing Meadows Corona Park (Queens Museum of Art)
Summer Movies in NYC: Fire in Babylon
6:30 p.m.
“Join Rooftop Films on the lawn at the Queens Museum of Art for a night of live music.”

August 4

Alley Pond Park (Adventure Center)

Invasive Removal at Alley Pond Park, Queens
9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
“Join us as we remove invasive from several reforestation plantings in Alley Pond Park, Queens. Please come help take care of our young forest, learn about restoration efforts across the city, and make a positive impact! Volunteers should come dressed in closed-toe shoes, long pants and clothing that can get dirty. No registration required.”

Idlewild Park

Advanced Canoeing
11:00 a.m.
“Our trained Urban Park Rangers will lead you on canoe adventures that range from the gentle waters of protected lakes, to the challenging open waters of rivers and bays. On an Urban Park Ranger canoe program, you can go from novice to expert in one just one summer! Children 8 years old and up are welcome.”

August 5

Forest Park

Fitness Hike (Vigorous)
1:00 p.m.
“Hiking is the ultimate way to enjoy the outdoors and reduce stress. Regardless of the intensity level, it is a great way to burn calories and stay fit. Our Urban Park Ranger hiking guides will introduce you to the hidden gems of New York City and places often off limits to the general public. On our hikes, you may explore nature, discover our City’s rich history and diverse culture, or just unplug form the world to clear your head.”

August 8

Crocheron Park (Buz O’ Rourke Playground)

Magic and Comedy of Jim McClenahan
10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
“Join us for the colorful and zany comedy with a magical twist that will bring giggles from children and adults.”

August 9

Forest Park

Zumba
5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
“Enjoy this new fitness craze and make new friends! All are invited – no age limit or skill required – just enjoy the outdoors and be fit!”

Stayin’ Alive
7:30 p.m.
“Come join us and enjoy a musical tribute to the Bee Gees.”

August 10

Grover Cleveland Park

Dancing Under the Stars
5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
“Come join us for an evening of music, face painting for children, a raffle drawing and Latin dance instruction under the stars!”

August 11

Wayanda Park

Family Day
12:00p.m- 4:00p.m.
“Children of all ages can participate in a free afternoon of crafts, games, music, inflatables, pony rides and more!”

Rufus King Park

Hands-on History: A Barn Full of Animals
12:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
“Rufus had all sorts of animals on this farm! Learn about the different animals that used to live at King Park. Bring your favorite stuffed animal and enjoy making a special craft for your animal!”

Cunningham Park

Family Camping
6:00 p.m.
“The Urban Park Rangers celebrate the tradition of camping throughout the spring and summer, and we look forward to welcoming your family!”

August 16

Forest Park

Wondrous Stories
7:30 p.m.
“Enjoy an evening of rock’s most time tested music from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s.”

August 18

Fort Totten Park

Historic New York Walking Tour: Fort Totten
1:00 p.m.
“Urban Park Rangers specialize in interpretation of historic turning points, both natural and man-made, in our city’s long history.”

August 19

Flushing Meadows Corona Park

Basic Canoeing
11:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
“Our trained Urban Park Rangers will lead you on canoe adventures that range from the gentle waters of protected lakes, to the challenging open waters of rivers and bays. On an Urban Park Ranger canoe program, you can go from novice to expert in just one summer!”

August 26

Cunningham Park

Biking
11:00 a.m.
“Our Urban Park Ranger cycling guides will introduce you to some of the most famous parks in the world. Enjoy breathtaking views, public artwork, landscape design and an abundance of wildlife.”

September 2

Flushing Meadows Corona Park

Hiking
10:00 a.m.
“Hiking is the ultimate way to enjoy the outdoors and reduce stress. Regardless of the intensity level, it is a great way to burn calories and stay fit. Our Urban Park Ranger hiking guides will introduce you to the hidden gems of New York City and places often off limits to the general public. On our hikes, you may explore nature, discover our City’s rich history and diverse culture, or just unplug form the world to clear your head.”

West Nile spraying in Queens this week


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Courtesy of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

With summer in the city comes humidity, mosquitoes and the threat of West Nile Virus.

To help fight the spread of the virus, the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene will apply larvicide by helicopter to locations throughout Queens, the Bronx and Staten Island beginning today.

The locales are marshy, non-residential areas that are natural breeding grounds for mosquitoes.

In Queens, areas of Alley Pond Park, College Point and Edgemere will be targeted.

Last year, the city saw 11 cases of West Nile, five in Queens.

A Queens woman passed away in March from what the family said was complications from West Nile. The city’s health department is investigating the report.

To help reduce the number of mosquitoes breeding on residents’ property, the health department said to eliminate standing water, clean your gutters and clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs and keep them empty or covered when not in use.

The marsh areas inside Alley Pond Park, the abandoned Flushing airport bounded by the Whitestone Expressway to the east, 20th Avenue to the north, 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south and Dubos Point and Edgemere Park bounded by Norton Basin to the east, Mott Point to the north, Grass Hassock Channel to the west and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south.

The spraying began today at 6 a.m. and will last until 7 p.m.  The schedule will be repeated tomorrow and Wednesday.

Man found dead in Oakland Lake


| brennison@queenscourier.com

A man was found floating in Oakland Lake on Sunday morning by a man out fishing, according to reports.

The Asian man was pulled from the Alley Pond Park Lake after the fisherman called for help, reports said.

The deceased man was wearing dark pants and a light-color shirt and looked as if he was in his 50s, according to published reports.

 

 

 

Runners raise funds for Forest Park


| ecamhi@queenscourier.com

Runners — both avid and amateur — came from all areas of Queens to compete in this year’s 5K race in Forest Park.

About 172 people raced on Sunday, October 2 to raise money for Forest Park Trust, Inc., which provides Forest Park with free educational, recreational and cultural events.

Joining the runners were scores of volunteers and spectators who cheered as each crossed the finish line. The race began and concluded in Victory Field Running Track, with check-points setup throughout the trail route. Professional scoring and assistance was provided by the Forest Park Runners Club.

Ricardo Cuahuizo, 23, of Elmhurst was the first to cross the finish line with a time of 17:04, while Francisco Martinez, 41, of Jackson Heights finished second with a time of 17:06. Jesus Bazan, 26, of Woodhaven finished third.

When asked about the win, Cuahuizo said he was “happy” that he did well and called Forest Park “his place” for daily training after he finishes his work day in the construction industry. Cuahuizo has been active in local races and finished first in the Mile Challenge held in Alley Pond Park this April and seventh in Forest Park’s 4-Mile Classic Road and Trail Run this May.

But the race attracted runners at all levels.

Allison Mintz, 37, of Forest Hills said she recently began participating in community races for pure enjoyment.

Frank Gallo, Forest Park Runners Club’s race director, was very pleased with the turnout and the cooperating weather. Gallo applauded the runners and also emphasized the crucial role volunteers play in orchestrating this and other race events.

“I told them, ‘You’re all special. There’s a reason why you do this. It’s something inside you that makes you feel good.’ If I don’t have the volunteers to place pointers or give out the water, it’s not happening,” he said.

Also part of the event was a Children’s Field Day, which took place in the middle of Victory Field before and during the race. Volunteers, many of whom were Forest Hills High School students, helped youngsters with a variety of activities like a 50-yard dash “Fun Run,” as well as life-size chess and checkers games.

For an official list of all winners of the 5K race,visitwww.nycgovparks.org orwww.forestparkrunners.org.

The next big race at Forest Park will be the 4-Mile Classic Road and Trail Run in May 2012.