Tag Archives: 2013 mayoral primaries

Joe Lhota officially enters mayoral race


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Lhoto photo courtesy of MTA/Flickr / Additional photos courtesy of Twitter (@JoeLhota)

It’s official. Joe Lhota, former CEO and chair of the MTA, is a mayoral candidate.

On Thursday Lhota filed papers with the Board of Elections to become the 109th mayor of New York City.

This morning on his newly created campaign website and Facebook page as well as on both his personal and campaign Twitter accounts he made the announcement:

He also tweeted an image with the slogan “A mayor for all of New York, proven leadership” and a photoshopped picture of Grand Central’s Mercury clock  with “Joe Lhota for Mayor” written below it.

The ex-transit head stepped down from his MTA position at the end of 2012 so he could ponder his candidacy, and said he would make his final decision on running in early January.

Lhota, a former deputy mayor for operations during the Rudy Giuliani administration, will reportedly run as a Republican.

Among his own party Lhota is a top contender, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday.

Twenty-three percent of New York City voters said they would vote for Lhota in a Republican primary for mayor.

Coming in second was supermarket mogul John Catsimatidis with nine percent, followed by newspaper publisher Tom Allon with five percent, former Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion with three percent and Doe Fund founder George McDonald with two percent.

But 53 percent of those surveyed were still undecided.

The same Quinnipiac poll also found that voters would back several potential Democratic candidates, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio and City Comptroller William Thompson, over Lhota by a 3-1 margin or more.

 

 

Ex-MTA chief Lhota closer to mayoral run


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of MTA/Flickr

Former MTA Chairman and CEO Joe Lhota is on the fast track to a mayoral bid.

According to media reports, at a New York Building Congress luncheon Monday, Lhota said that he intends to file papers to run for mayor this week.

“I would not have left the MTA, a job and position that I loved, if I was not going to run for mayor of New York,” he said yesterday.

Lhota stepped down from his position heading the city’s transit agency last month in order to explore running in the 2013 race.

When he announced his resignation on December 19, Lhota said that he would make his decision on running for New York City mayor in early January.

A former deputy mayor for operations during the Rudy Giulianni administration, Lhota is expected to run as a Republican and get the endorsement of his ex-boss.

 

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MTA head Joe Lhota resigns to explore mayoral run


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of MTA/Flickr

Following the MTA board’s approval of his fare hike proposal, CEO and Chairman Joe Lhota announced that he will resign, effective December 31, to consider running for New York City mayor in 2013.

At the announcement, Lhota said that he would make “no further comment” on his mayoral candidacy until early January, when he will announce his decision.

The approved fare and toll changes, which raise the MetroCard base and unlimited fares, reduce the discount, as well as increases ticket prices on the Long Island Railroad and Metro-North, and raise tolls on MTA bridges and tunnels, are Lhota’s last hoorah as the agency’s head, and could conceivably hurt his chances among voters.

Post-Sandy polls showed that the majority of New Yorkers were pleased with how the MTA responded to the superstorm and its aftermath, but voters are fed up with the frequent fare hikes.

His party could also be an obstacle.

After two decades, the city will likely have a Democratic mayor again.

A November Quinnipiac University poll found that if Lhota ran for mayor as a Republican he would lose to an unnamed Democratic candidate 60 to nine percent. Forty-five percent of those surveyed also disapproved of how Lhota is handling his job as the head of the MTA.

Current mayor Michael Bloomberg, who ran for his first two terms as a Republican before switching to an Independent before his third run, is expected to endorse City Council Speaker and Democrat Christine Quinn, and reportedly even asked Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to run.

Another former mayor, Rudy Giuliani, however, is expected to endorse Lhota, who served as his deputy mayor for operations. Giuliani also reportedly encouraged him to run.

The MTA chair also worked in investment banking, was an executive vice president for the Madison Square Garden Company, and served as the city’s budget director and commissioner of finance, before Governor

Andrew Cuomo appointed him as head of the transit agency in November 2011.

Before facing a Democrat, Lhota needs to win the Republican primary, where he could run against newspaper publisher Tom Allon, billionaire grocer John Catsimatidis, NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, former Bronx borough president Adolfo Carrión Jr. and Doe Fund founder and president George McDonald.

The same November Quinnipiac poll also found that Lhota would lose to Carrión 62 to 11 percent.

 

NYC voters less likely to elect atheist, born-again Christian as mayor


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Though most New York City voters do not consider religion a factor in choosing the next mayor, a Quinnipiac University poll released today found that New York City voters are less likely to elect an atheist or born-again Christian than a Muslim or a Mormon.

According to the results, 30 percent of city voters are less likely to vote for an atheist and 27 percent are less likely to elect a born-again Christian; they also said that they were 24 percent less likely to vote for a Mormon candidate and 19 percent less likely to choose a Muslim. But 61 percent of voters said that religious positions would not affect their vote.

The poll also asked voters about other characteristics outside of religion: 16 percent are less likely to vote for an overweight or obese person, 10 percent are less likely to vote for a gay or lesbian mayor and 1 percent said they are less likely to elect a woman.

The last two characteristics are particularly important since Christine Quinn is one of the top candidates in the 2013 New York City race for mayor. If she wins, Quinn will be the city’s first female mayor and the first openly gay one.

But those factors will have little effect on voters. The poll found that 29 percent of New York voters are planning on voting for her in the Democratic mayoral primaries. In second place was City Comptroller William Thompson with 10 percent and 9 percent of voters said they would elect city Comptroller John Liu and Public Advocate Bill de Blasio. Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer received 4 percent and only 1 percent of city voters said they would cast their ballot for newspaper publisher Tom Allon.

Quinnipiac also polled city voters about the recent Chick-fil-A controversy. The majority of voters (74 percent) believe a “business owner’s controversial or unpopular opinions should not affect the ability to get government permits to do business,” and that “elected officials should not try to discourage people from patronizing such a business.”