Tag Archives: 104 precinct

Car break-ins increasing in Glendale, police and residents say


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Joann Guidici

Glendale is seeing a rise in car break-ins this year, according to police.

During a community meeting on May 20, Capt. Christopher Manson, commanding officer of the 104th Precinct, said that compared to last year, there was a rise in thefts from automobiles.

He was unable to provide exact stats at the meeting, but, through May 18, the latest state available on the NYPD website, there were marked increases in both grand larceny (up 21 percent) and petit larceny (up 16.5 percent).

The spike in crime is leaving many residents of this usually quiet neighborhood surprised and frustrated with cops.

Joann Guidici, a resident of Glendale, found her car broken into on a recent Saturday morning. The car had been parked on 72nd Street and the driver window was smashed but nothing valuable had been stolen from the car.

“They must’ve done it for the high,” she said. “Because they didn’t take any of the valuable stuff.”

She noted that there had been two pairs of expensive, designer glasses in the car that were left untouched.

Brian Dooley, a member of the Glendale Property Owners Organization, had a similar experience.

“My car was broken into twice,” he said. Unlike Guidici, there were no broken windows. “The first time I thought that we had left the car unlocked. But after the second incident, I knew that they must be using a magnetic device of some sort.”

Manson echoed Dooley’s suspicion about the use of a magnetic device.

“Most of the cases we’ve responded to are with cars that don’t have any broken windows or picked locks,” he said during the meeting. “So we think that whoever is doing that is using some kind of magnetic device.”

Police say they are doing everything they can to stop the spike in car break-ins, which are mostly occurring in Glendale with a few also in Middle Village. But Guidici said that it isn’t enough.

“This has been an issue for over a year,” she said. “The 104th Precinct wasn’t very helpful. They need to step it up.”

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104th Precinct officers donate to needy Ridgewood family


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Police officers from the 104th Precinct played Santa Claus for one Ridgewood family that recently suffered from domestic violence.

Officer Nicholas Cadavid and Sergeant Martha Lequerica organized a precinct donation collection for the family on Thursday, December 19, and raised more than $1,200.

Last week officers arrested a five-year-old boy’s father, whose name was withheld to protect the anonymity of the victims, for severely beating his son. The boy had bruises on his face and a gash on his forehead and need to be taken to a local hospital for stitches, police said.

“We see bad stuff every day but this one really stuck to us, when we saw the plight of this family,” said Captain Chris Manson of the 104th Precinct.

When the officers learned that the family of the boy was in need, they decided to donate some gifts. The boy lives with his mother and three other siblings, ages 11, 8, and a two-month-old infant in a Ridgewood apartment.

The officers brought the children snacks, bags filled with toys and clothes and boots for the cold weather. The money raised will go to buy bunk beds for the children.

 

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More manpower in 104 ‘shows right away’


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Over a dozen more officers will be patrolling the streets of southwest Queens after an influx of cops to the 104th Precinct.

Captain John Travaglia, Executive Officer at the 104th Precinct, told the gathering of residents at the Middle Village Property Owners and Resident’s Association that the new officers are showing immediate returns.

“The increase in manpower shows right away,” said Travaglia, who added the precinct is now able to send out six or seven cars per tour, along with specialty units.
Eight of the officers, all of which were assigned to patrol, have been deployed on the midnight tour.

The officers came from impact zones throughout the city.

Also discussed at the meeting was the proliferation of noise complaints — the number one grievance in the city, the officers said — that arise as the weather warms up.

While the officers said “unreasonable noise” is not acceptable at any time during the day, after 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. the allowable decibel level decreases.

Enforcing noise violations is difficult, officers said, because the culprit often turns the volume down when a police vehicle approaches.