A week of joyousness


| vschneps@queenscourier.com |

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I smiled from ear to ear as I entered the newly designed Queens Museum, opposite the Unisphere in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. It was their annual Spookfest, delayed by the building’s construction. But, it was the best ever and I think the fabulous costumes and joyous faces of the children were not diminished because the “real” Halloween had passed.

The staff at the Museum had created wonderful paper mache figures and my grandson Jonah adored the horse and the horseman. His creativity flowed when he and another energetic young boy found a way to ride the “horses” and do battle with the clappers that were in their “Ricky’s NYC” gift bags.

Jonah had great fun bowling with pins painted to look like skeletons with a very enthusiastic “bowl master,” who gave high-fives as Jonah delightedly rolled the ball and knocked the pins down.

What a wonderful day that made the guests feel so happy. Much thanks for the event goes to co-chairs Jackie Hemmerdinger and Amy D’Amato and sponsors Flushing Bank, Ricky’s NYC, Elliot and Julienne Park and Aflac.
I loved the costumed marching band of drummers, an accordion player and two trombone players, all inviting the audience to follow, which we all did.

The young families, many of whom had never been to the newly designed Museum, seemed to be part of a lovefest that snowy afternoon. A lot of effort went into the event’s preparation, but I’m sure everyone who experienced the fun will forever be a museum fan. You should too, because once you visit you will want to return to see the amazing Panorama of the City of New York, or attend an art class with your children, or visit the remarkable Tiffany glass collection, or . . . I could go on. Yes, it is a wonderful place to visit and revisit! Try it, you will love it !
‘The Lion King’ again.

Every year Broadway runs a two-for-one special on tickets. So I reserved my seats for “The Lion King” and on Sunday, I had the pleasure of bringing my 15-year-old Ben Broner and four-year-old Morgan Sohmer to see one of my favorite shows. Its unique costuming, sets, music and staging are a creation of genius minds.

The music that the brilliant, internationally famous Elton John and Tim Rice wrote keeps you singing long after you leave the theatre. The remarkably talented Julie Taymor’s costume design, direction, mask and puppet design make this one of the most unique productions I’ve ever seen. I felt like I was in the jungle with the animals. My favorite song, “Hakuna Matata,” which means “no worries” is a great mantra to remember in troubled times. The show was a treat to all my senses.

In a few weeks I will be in the real jungle in South Africa and Zambia, where I’m going on a safari. I hope it’s as engaging as my visit with the lions of “The Lion King!”