Street Talk: What are your memories of the day John F. Kennedy was assassinated?


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com |

street talk

We asked Queens residents what they remember from the day JFK was assassinated.

 

I was sitting in my classroom, when my teacher left the room and came back crying. She announced that JFK had been shot and would probably not survive the attack. A lot of my classmates started crying along with her. I don’t think I cried because I didn’t understand the scope of what happened.
Beth Johnson

 

I remember our teacher telling us that JFK had died. I never had to process anything like that. Over the next few days, I remember seeing the assassination played on television over and over again and then watching the funeral on television.
David Caterina

 

It was certainly very shocking. When I first heard what happened, I thought it must have been an accident. But as more information came out and I realized it was an assassination, I remember being scared that a war would start because of it.
Mabel James

 

I was actually out of school sick that day. I was sitting on the couch, watching TV with my family, when a voice came on that announced that Kennedy had been shot. My whole family just sat there speechless.
Mary Gruel

 

My fifth grade teacher came in and asked us if we knew what an assassination was. None of us did. So, she told us and then had us write down how we felt about it. I still have it in a drawer at my home.
Michael Dorsey

 

I remember sitting in my fifth grade classroom. I started crying along with other kids in my class, and some others just sat there in shock.

Mindy Mayer

 

I remember not being able to understand why someone would ever want to kill President Kennedy. He was a good man with a good heart, and I also remember coming home and seeing my mother crying in front of our television.
Sarah Tracy


I actually came from a Republican family, but I remember seeing both of my parents crying when I got home from school that day. That taught me a lot about having respect for life, regardless of political affiliation.
William Davis

BY JOHANN HAMILTON

 

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