Ozone Park could be home to new pedestrian plaza

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The city Department of Transportation proposed a pedestrian plaza at the intersection of Liberty Avenue and 101st Avenue in Ozone Park.THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes / Renderings courtesy of the DOT
The city Department of Transportation proposed a pedestrian plaza at the intersection of Liberty Avenue and 101st Avenue in Ozone Park.

A pedestrian plaza could be coming to an area of Ozone Park the Department of Transportation (DOT) said is under-utilized and in need of more open space.

The Bangladeshi American Community Development & Youth Service (BACDYS) applied to create a plaza at the intersection of Liberty Avenue and 101st Avenue near Drew Street, just on the Brooklyn-Queens border.

The plan already has the support of Brooklyn Community Board (CB) 5, as well as area businesses in both boroughs and local elected officials, including Councilmember Eric Ulrich, according to the DOT. Community Board (CB) 9 will vote on the proposal next month.

 

“The project would provide additional open space, serving pedestrians and customers of local businesses,” said a DOT spokesperson.

However, reservations still exist for CB 9.

The plaza would close off the Drew Street through-way from 101st Avenue to Liberty Avenue and would also change both streets from two-way to one-way. Eleven parking spots would also be lost.

Mary Ann Carey, CB 9’s district manager, said these are the “biggest issues” for the board.

“Why didn’t they choose a much a much larger plaza,” she asked, pointing to the space near Elderts Lane and Liberty Avenue just a few blocks down.

She continued that now the board is “just fact finding” and preparing for next month’s vote.

The DOT said this particular proposed area has an active retail business and existing open space, and is being under-utilized.

If approved, BACDYS would be responsible for the upkeep of the public plaza, which anyone can visit and also apply to hold events.

The plaza, whose cost was unclear as of press time, would be made up of gravel, granite blocks, planters, flexible delineators, movable tables and chairs, benches, permanent bench seating and bike parking, similar to other city plazas.

After the CB 9 vote, the DOT projects a potential implementation in late September. Public outreach for a permanent plaza design would then begin in the spring of 2014.

 

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