The good, the better and the bad in Queens


| editorial@queenscourier.com |



THE GOOD . . .

Queens came out in force on Memorial Day to pay tribute to those heroes who have fought – and continue to fight – for the freedoms we enjoy.

As Mayor Michael Bloomberg pointed out, freedom is not, in fact, free, and the men and women in uniform – from our Armed Services to the NYPD and FDNY – fight every day to preserve and protect our liberties.

So it is with great pride that we say “thank you,” and are glad to have seen the patriotic displays this Memorial Day.

But let us also remember the other 364 days in the year in which to be grateful for our veterans.

 

THE BETTER . . .

Score one for the community coming together.

It was a long-fought and hard-won battle, but a Flushing Key Food will NOT be replaced by yet another pharmacy.

We say congratulations because, by coming together, the community was able to affect change.

Residents opposed the change, especially since the area has several pharmacies, including one across the street from the supermarket, but the store owner felt pressured to leave the property.

Rallies ensued, and the owner, politicians and even the locals sent a clear message – “keep our Key Food.”

We’re glad to say their message has been received.

 

THE BAD . . .

Seniors deserve respect.

The Friendship Center of the Jamaica Service Program for Older Adults (JSPOA) is just one of many facing cuts as part of the city’s budget for the 2013 Fiscal Year, which, if not restored, will phase out programs for members — many of whom are mentally and physically weak.

But aside from the visible benefits to seniors, these centers also serve as a “home away from home” for many.

Programs offered help to keep members active and healthy. Often, the meals provided are the only source of nutrition for these people.

And the benefits seniors receive through socializing at the centers are immeasurable. Most would otherwise face very lonely days.

So we implore the mayor – look beyond the numbers to the HUMAN aspect.

Look at the REAL costs of these dollar-saving measures, and, as one senior aptly pointed out, “[Don’t forget you’re] going to be old one day.”