Victoria’s Secrets


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A Weekend In Manhattan

To celebrate the marriage of Bari Robin Yunis to David Evan Schorr we stayed where the wedding was held – the landmark St. Regis Hotel.

While staying for the weekend we had brunch at the historic 100-year-old King Cole Bar that features Maxfield Parrish’s amusing mural (the king’s face is actually Mr. Astor himself who had commissioned the piece). It is the backdrop of the bar where the first

Bloody Mary was created. So, of course, I had one, and it was just spicy enough to be the best one I ever had!

While staying for the weekend we had brunch at the historic 100-year-old King Cole Bar that features Maxfield Parrish’s amusing mural (the king’s face is actually Mr. Astor himself who had commissioned the piece). It is the backdrop of the bar where the first Bloody Mary was created. So, of course, I had one, and it was just spicy enough to be the best one I ever had!

We sat facing the mural surrounded by rich, dark polished mahogany-lined walls and had Sunday brunch. The portions were so large we couldn’t finish them, so I’d recommend you share one main course. The crunchy rolls made me forget my diet. They were too good to resist!

From there we saw the first of three shows we had tickets for — “Regrets Only” with the talented and beautiful Christine Baranski and the great George Grizzard leading the cast at the Manhattan Theatre Club. It’s a small theatre that is a part of a large complex at City Center. The non-profit group has produced hundreds of plays and their productions have earned many Tony awards, Pulitzer prizes,

Obies and Dream Dish awards. “Regrets Only,” sadly, was closing because of its limited run. The actors made me laugh, cry and care about them — the ingredients of a great show!

Before we went to see our Regrets Only we were walking along 57th Street and Stu suggested we have lunch at The Four Seasons Hotel where they opened a new restaurant whose celebrated three-star chef runs L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon. It was everything you’d expect from a great restaurant — superb food, beautifully presented and served in a luxurious setting. My favorite entree, steak tartar — fresh ground beef with egg, spices and parsley — was a rare treat. There is a prix-fixe lunch, which offers an appetizer, entree and dessert at a more affordable price than dinner.

Then, on Sunday, we saw “The Little Dog Laughed,” another fine play. It took me into the world of Hollywood. The wonderful actress Julie White, an agent for her client, played superbly by the star of TV’s “Saved,” Tom Everett Scott, brought me into how an actor is manipulated into stardom. It was a wonderful drama.

The Apple Tree starred 4’ 11” Kristen Chenoweth. She mesmerized me with her performance. Hurry, try to get tickets. She’s a star not-to-be-missed in the tradition of Ethel Merman, Martha Raye, Madeline Kahn and Barbara Harris, who originated the role in 1966.

You might have seen her In The West Wing, The Music Man, Annie, Frasier and even singing with several of the best orchestras and opera companies in America.

The standing ovation she received was well earned. What a treat!

While seeing all these shows in a weekend could be overwhelming — one on Saturday and two on Sunday — but it was a real gift.

When theatre is great, you escape from the real world for a few hours. I also love the opportunity to be transported to “another place.”It was a magical weekend that I will cherish and a wedding to be remembered.